Telemeres


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By Alma - 3/29/2011 10:35:49 AM
Are there any suppliments recommended to lengthen telomeres? What about Astragaloside IV? How does it differ from Astragalus?
By DDye - 3/29/2011 11:31:19 AM
Some supplements are associated with longer telomeres, but this is because their rate of shortening has been slowed, not because they are growing longer.  See http://www.lef.org/newsletter/2009/0317_Longer-Telomeres-Associated-with-Multivitamin-Use.htm

http://www.lef.org/whatshot/2009_09.htm#longer-telomeres-found-in-tea-drinkers

http://www.lef.org/whatshot/2008_11.htm#Astragalus-compound-slows-telomere-shortening-T-lymphocytes

http://www.lef.org/newsletter/2010/0122_Omega-3-Fatty-Acid-Telomere-Shortening-Rate.htm
By DanRo - 3/30/2011 6:44:41 AM
Vitamin D has also been known to prolong telomere length:

http://www.ajcn.org/content/86/5/1420.full
By Rossicloud - 5/6/2011 6:16:18 AM
Does Life Extension anticipate marketing a product that addresses telomere lengthening; whether to slow or replace shortened telomeres or some such variation of lengthening that produces life extending or positive health effects?
By Tom. - 5/11/2011 6:25:09 AM
If telomeres can be lengthened and life extended, is the concept of chronological age and time altered as well. For example, taking a decade of time, let's say from 50 years to 60 years. Without lengthening telomeres, you age X amount. You start lengthening telomeres at 50 years, would time be altered so that the span of 50 to 60 years without telemeres lengthening is really, let's say, the same as 50 to 70 years (as an example) with lengthening telemeres?  What would your chronological age really be then in our present day concept of age and time?  2nd question, lengthening your telemeres doesn't improve your health status right? So in effect you're just extending out the inevitable age related diseases that you might have had anyway? Correct?


By albedo - 5/13/2011 12:33:02 AM
Tom. (5/11/2011)
If telomeres can be lengthened and life extended, is the concept of chronological age and time altered as well....

I would say yes if I assume that my biological age is lower than my chronological when I succeed to delay disease in general or say delay functional degradation of the fastest aging organ (you are as old as your oldest organ, E Braveman uses to day). We really would need to prove that telomere lengthening can rejuvenate and even reverse disease. One of the recent LEF articles points to that. But then there is the controversy on higher cancer risks. Recollect also the aggressive proposal by Aubrey de Grey called WILT.
By peterz - 5/18/2011 11:59:53 PM
associations between chronic stress and accelerated telomere shortening have been observed:

http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0010837

And I believe there is some evidence that a modest amount of exercise will help combat the stress effects.  
By skmackie - 5/19/2011 10:27:37 AM
Mercola likes whey protein:
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2010/02/23/science-finally-reveals-how-you-can-actually-revese-aging.aspx

Also he does an interview with Elizabeth Blackburn who wrote "The Immortality Edge," which Mercola says is the current best book on how to increase telomere length:
By peterz - 5/19/2011 1:42:53 PM
Mercola is a blatant $$ site.......please post links to published scientific research in abstract or full paper form...And please provide evidence that Blackburn is claiming that telemeres are THE magic bullet and that she shows how to keep them at a young status and that this dramatically slows aging....just looking at her tells me she doesn't know the answer and at best has only fleshed out a small part of the picture.....

a lot of research points to there being many interconnecting processes which affect aging, telemeres possibly being part.
By Tom. - 5/19/2011 4:52:30 PM
Hey Peter good to see you on the new forum. 

Yes, exercise has many benefits ... I can think of a few: Increases circulation and oxygen to the vital organs like the brain, strengthening the heart and lungs, maintaining muscle tissue, bone loss prevention, flexability, increases mood and well-being, increases stamina, stimulates the immune system, helps with proper functioning of the digestive system ..
By Tom. - 5/19/2011 7:31:26 PM
Has Life Extension Foundation considered oleuropein for their CR Mimetic Longevity Formula?

http://tinyurl.com/telomere-oleuropein
By DDye - 5/20/2011 12:10:24 PM
Tom, your question was forwarded to Life Extension's Product Development department. 

Oleuropein does occur in this product:  http://www.lef.org/Vitamins-Supplements/Item01483/Super-Omega-3-EPA-DHA-with-Sesame-Lignans-Olive-Fruit-Extract.html?source=search&key=oleuropein
By Tom. - 5/20/2011 7:12:56 PM
Thanks DDye. Yes but it's a very small amount. 1.5 mg doesn't seem like much as a companion for the CR Mimetic Longevity Formula.  From the research I posted there seems to be controversy on affective absorbtion. I wonder how much oleuropein one would have to take orally to generate a significant impact.  This product looks like a good brand but it doesn't say how much oleuropein it contains.

Product Development might also find this study of interest in regard to oleuropein extraction.

The researchers set out to test the best extraction method of oleuropein from olive leaf.  Because oleuropein is a water-soluble phenolic compound, dried olive leaf powder in deionized water at 60 °C with a pH of 3, for four hours seemed to yield the highest concentration. At a aqueous pH of 3,  it was up to 10 times more effective than any other water pH. More than 4 hours of extraction the yield decreased probably due to oxidation of compound.  The resulting extractions were stored in the dark at 4 °C (
39.2 °F) and found to be stable for at least a month. 

The sample of olive leaf used in this aqueous extraction method were taken from around Iran. The different geographic origins produced a yield that varied from 6.1 to 13.0 mg of oleuroppein per gram of olive leaf dried powder.  Olive trees in somewhat chillier climates and proper soil tend to produce the higher yields.  Growing conditions and soil type are important for the extraction process.

Toxic solvants such as hexane are not necessary as this study has proven that simple, environmentally friendly water extraction is effective.

By 4life - 5/25/2011 12:01:16 AM
Astragalus membranaceus root contains astragaloside IV, other astragalosides, and other substances that have been found to activate telomerase production, including cycloastragenol, which is what the super-expensive TA-65 sold by TA sciences contains. There is a lot of information to be found about astragalus and telomerase at http://vidainstitute.org.

I have been using a regimen of astragalus and astragalus extract as tea or added to food and coffee, for three months now and have already gotten sensational results. It has almost completely cured several physical conditions that resulted from aging, including a back problem (compressed disk and osteoarthritic degeneration), laryngoesophageal reflus disease (LERD), arthritis in a shoulder, knee pain, and even shrank my hemorrhoids. Since adding centella asiatica (gotu kola) to my astragalus regimen, I have gotten a substantial improvement in my vision. I am now able to read without glasses, something I haven't been able to do in fifteen years.
By 4life - 5/25/2011 12:06:37 AM
Incidentally, telomerase activators can actually LENGTHEN telomeres. See this post at longecity.or http://www.longecity.org/forum/topic/19921-astragalus-astragaloside-iv/page__st__1060__p__444060#entry444060 Look at the last section on "standardized astragalus root extract"
By albedo - 5/25/2011 6:49:17 AM
Tom. (5/21/2011)
Thanks DDye. Yes but it's a very small amount. 1.5 mg doesn't seem like much as a companion for the CR Mimetic Longevity Formula.  From the research I posted there seems to be controversy on affective absorbtion. I wonder how much oleuropein one would have to take orally to generate a significant impact.  This product looks like a good brand but it doesn't say how much oleuropein it contains.

Product Development might also find this study of interest in regard to oleuropein extraction.

.....
The sample of olive leaf used in this aqueous extraction method were taken from around Iran. The different geographic origins produced a yield that varied from 6.1 to 13.0 mg of oleuroppein per gram of olive leaf dried powder....


Tom, very interesting post and study you did. As you might recollect from an exchange in the old forum I am particularly interested to this as my family has its own produce of olive oil.

I was reading (e.g. here) that the extraction process, beside weight, should keep high the R-oleuropein form (vs the L-form) which does not bind easily and remains active in vivo.

Thank you for the product link you posted, it might be a good addition to my regime if necessary.

I was also searching here  on oleuropein content in leafs but could not find information; however, from the Iranian study you posted, it seems ~1% by weight is typical.