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40yo with slowly getting worse brain memory

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 Posted 7/28/2013 11:47:34 PM
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Am 40 yo male who exercises. Currently take omega 3 and multi vitamins daily.

Have begin to notice as I get older am starting to have small lapses in memory and make silly mistakes. As years go on it gets progressively worse.
I don't want to get to 60yo and have a poor brain function at this rate. 

Are there any super drugs or brain supplements which I could take long term that would keep my brain functioning better?

I realize that as I get older I might lose some brain power but I want to limit this onset. 
I have met some amazing 60 year old plus people who seem to have great brains.

Your thoughts?
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 Posted 7/29/2013 2:22:56 PM
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A lot of things helped me a little with memory and concentration: phosphatidylserine, ubiquinol + shilajit, B vitamins, carnosine, lecithin and pycnogenol, but hormones may be the biggest factor. Changing hormones seems to make me the worst, but once they're stable again I get better. Unfortunately, hormones start changing themselves in your 40s. If you aren't already replacing DHEA and 7-keto DHEA, that might be a good place to start. Life Extension has good hormone blood tests, so you can see how you're faring.

Other supplements that didn't help me with memory and concentration are acetyl-L carnitine + lipoic acid. Inflammation can be a factor, so you might want to test your C-reactive protein. Essential fatty acids could be important. With age, I find it harder to eat enough healthy fats, as my appetite has slowed down.

If you find anything that helps you, please share your tips or results.

Good luck, Wally!
Elaine
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 Posted 7/30/2013 4:34:23
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hi Wally.

Have you perused the information at http://www.lef.org/protocols/neurological/age_related_cognitive_decline_01.htm ?

How is your sleep?  Have you had head injuries?

You might want to consult with your physician regarding this.  Memory loss can be due to controllable factors, such as stress, hypoglycemia or sleep apnea. There are other causes that are best treated early.  One can be tested for a genetic variant associated with Alzheimer's disease and one can also undergo an MRI to rule out conditions such as brain bleeds or masses. 

D Dye
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 Posted 9/18/2013 1:14:49
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You are likely choline deficit as older men need at least 700mg a day to offset dementia and average intake is only 300mg.  So get some lecithin and take 1T a day (1500mg choline) unless you rather eat 7+ egg yolks a day. BigGrin
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 Posted 10/1/2013 8:53:06
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It's not easy for a 20 year old to see the effects of stress on health, but at 40 you're starting to see the consequences of your lifestyle choices. I believe cumulative stress is a big factor in brain function. I hate to mention stress, because it makes people think. 1: stress is inevitable, so I can't do anything about it. 2: stress is only fixable by meditating or new agey stuff. Both are false. Meditation is great. It works and may be the easiest and cheapest way to reduce stress, but there are many other subtler factors you can employ, both supplements and lifestyle.

In my 50s, I shifted my daily decision making to reduce stress. My rational brain says I have enough time to do 3 errands after work today, but if I only do the two closest to home I'll be calmer and happier tonight. I have enough money to replace the windows in my home this year, but I'm repiping, too, so it's going to be overwhelming. The windows can wait. Life is a lot better when stress reduction is a part of daily decision making. I wish I had learned this when I was 10.

Walking, sun and fresh air are great for stress reduction. Finding root causes in relationship conflicts can help. Just noticing how I ending up arguing with people I mostly agree with helped me break the pattern. Money stress can be reduced by housing choices and reminding yourself that people lived for thousands of years without new cars, TVs and PCs.

Age 40 is a great time to get baseline hormone tests, and if unbalanced, start making small corrections that can help with stress and brain function. When we look for supplements, we choose ones that fit a problem we have, but I've often gotten better results from  supplements for stress. Anything that improves stress levels will improve many health problems. LEF has a great reference here: http://www.lef.org/protocols/emotional_health/stress_management_01.htm?source=search&key=stress

Good luck,
Elaine


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