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Anomalies in my blood tests report – can you explain?

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 Posted 7/16/2013 6:22:45 AM
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I have now my full blood tests results (see link incl. values, units and ref. ranges)

I would appreciate if you could comment on my findings in this post or anything you see as not normal in the full panel. It would also be great if someone from LEF could have a look.

link to june 2013 blood tests

Positive

  • Homocysteine has lowered from 14 to 12, so the Vit. B supplementation (moderate) looks working to some extent and intend to continue.
  • As expected after my TURP the PSA lowered to 0.8 and the ratio free/total looks in the safe range.
  • CRP remains low at 0.4 making me confident my anti-inflammatory regime, both with diet and supplementation, is working.
  • Iron lowed to 81 near the values of good years and I am pleased the otherwise high iron load measurement (ferritine) has dramatically lowered. I suspect both IP6 supplementation and green tea, both iron chelators, might be for something (note: phosphorous is normal, was a concern when using IP6)
  • WBCs increased back into the normal range. Wonder if this is due to remnants of my surgery or some short term supplementation (shark liver oil)

 Negative

  • DHEA is dramatically low at 15.4! I did many tries in the past to correct this but still concerned with supplementation due to the prostate condition. Would 7-keto help as it is supposed (some do not agree though) not to convert to T and E2?
  • Lp(a) dramatically increased to 393: any suggestion of a working protocol to reduce it? I understand niacin (high doses: 1-3 g) and Vitamin C + Lysine + Proline are supposed to help. The respective action mechanisms are not quite known: any experience? There is a strong hereditary component on Lp(a) and I always had it in the high range.
  • While still in the range, TSH increased to 4 (despite T3 and T4 are normal) likely due to soy consumption. I increased my iodine intake.
  • Palmitic free fatty acid is too high. I will investigate what changes I did in my diet. Any idea? However, despite this and other abnormalities in the FFA panel, key ratios such as oleic to palmitic, omega 6 to omega 3, omega 3 percentages and AA/EPA look relatively good though not ideal.
  • Total C is high at 208, despite HDL-C is ok and, importantly, the ratio HDL-C/Total C looks safe at 3.6
  • Calcium is a bit high (despite in the normal range) to 9.4


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Post #9526
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 Posted 7/16/2013 8:06:42 AM
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Excess iodine can potentially cause an increase in the TSH value.
Post #9528
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 Posted 7/17/2013 2:57:32 AM
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Albedo, obviously you need to take 7-Keto DHEA, 150-200 mg/day, all in the morning.  Stop taking or eating any form of soy.
Post #9536
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 Posted 7/17/2013 4:24:09 AM
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If you wish to elevate DHEA, use DHEA.  7-keto is a metabolite that provides some of the benefits of DHEA, and if you are satisfied with those you may also be content to have low serum DHEA.
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 Posted 7/18/2013 7:37:59 AM
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Ross, Transpower, DDye

Thank you for your comments. Really appreciated!

I need to research more and will likely decide to consult an hormone specialist, mostly for DHEA, to have clear mind.

With reference to excess iodine and TSH, I read about possible effect of overconsumption but feel this cannot be my case as the only modification I had before the last TSH measurement is the regular consumption of soy. I am not even sure of getting my RDA (150mcg) but will check more.

In my case Transpower is probably right as I must have over-consumed soy foods (almost every day), supplemented (moderately) with genistein and regularly eat cruciferous vegetables, the latter however since a long time. I think I will go step by step to stop supplementation and reducing soy foods before rechecking TSH.

I still believe soy foods are beneficial to my prostate condition yet a small dilemma and as usual a matter of balancing risk/benefits.

“Soy and its isoflavones (such as genistein ) appear to have numerous potential effects involving the thyroid gland. When given to people with impaired thyroid function, soy products have been observed to reduce absorption of thyroid medication. 6-8 In addition, some evidence hints that soy isoflavones may directly inhibit the function of the thyroid gland, although this inhibition may only be significant in people who are deficient in iodine.9-11 However, to make matters more confusing, studies of healthy humans and animals given soy isoflavones or other soy products have generally found that soy either had no effect on thyroid hormone levels, or actually increased levels. 12-16
The bottom line: In view of soy’s complex effects regardingthe thyroid, people with impaired thyroid function should not take large amounts of soy products except under the supervision of a physician.”
http://www.med.nyu.edu/content?ChunkIID=38740


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 Posted 7/18/2013 9:19:09 PM
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Albedo,

wish I could offer you some advice on this subject, but I'm just learning myself. I haven't had a need to be concerned with my blood work up until now as everything has been normal previously. I can give you one recommendation, I use iodine liquid supplement two drops in a glass of water per day seems to help.

-Tom

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Post #9561
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 Posted 7/19/2013 3:06:13 AM
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Thank you Tom. Do you know how much iodine that will be providing? I just started a small course with a kelp extract (30mg providing the RDA of 150mcg). Will give a small try and adjust with what I am already taking.

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 Posted 7/19/2013 4:15:11 AM
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This article (Goitrogenic and estrogenic activity of soy isoflavones) looks interesting in the context of this discussion:

"Soy is known to produce estrogenic isoflavones. Here, we briefly review the evidence for binding
of isoflavones to the estrogen receptor, in vivo estrogenicity and developmental toxicity, and
estrogen developmental carcinogenesis in rats. Genistein, the major soy isoflavone, also has a
frank estrogenic effect in women. We then focus on evidence from animal and human studies
suggesting a link between soy consumption and goiter, an activity independent of estrogenicity.
Iodine deficiency greatly increases soy antithyroid effects, whereas iodine supplementation is protective.

Thus, soy effects on the thyroid involve the critical relationship between iodine status and
thyroid function. In rats consuming genistein-fortified diets, genistein was measured in the thyroid
at levels that produced dose-dependent and significant inactivation of rat and human thyroid
peroxidase (TPO) in vitro. Furthermore, rat TPO activity was dose-dependently reduced by up to
80%. Although these effects are clear and reproducible, other measures of thyroid function
in vivo (serum levels of triiodothyronine, thyroxine, and thyroid-stimulating hormone; thyroid
weight; and thyroid histopathology) were all normal. Additional factors appear necessary for soy
to cause overt thyroid toxicity. These clearly include iodine deficiency but may also include additional
soy components, other defects of hormone synthesis, or additional goitrogenic dietary factors.
Although safety testing of natural products, including soy products, is not required, the
possibility that widely consumed soy products may cause harm in the human population via
either or both estrogenic and goitrogenic activities is of concern. Rigorous, high-quality experimental
and human research into soy toxicity is the best way to address these concerns. Similar
studies in wildlife populations are also appropriate."


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 Posted 7/19/2013 5:43:48 AM
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Your Vitamin D level at 86 nmol (34 ng) is generally considered to be borderline low. LEF recommends it to be above 125 nmol (50 ng), and mid range is around 160 nmol (65 ng). Note that increasing Vitamin D level may mess with mineral status, in my case it heavily affected manganese status.
Post #9567
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 Posted 7/20/2013 4:37:52 AM
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Few results of a small search (still on soy, elevation of TSH while normal T4 and T3) I find them interesting to interpret my results and might be interesting to others (bold is mine)

"...Goiter and high normal thyroidstimulating hormone (TSH) levels in healthy iodine-sufficient adults occurred as early as 1 month (n = 37) after commencing a diet that included 30 g of pickled soybeans per day (24). Although it was not measured, dietary iodine content may have been insufficient to protect against the antithyroid effect of soy. Furthermore, no changes in serum thyroid hormone [triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4)] levels were found. After 1 month off the soy diet, TSH decreased to the pretreatment levels and goiters were diminished in size..."
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1241182/pdf/ehp110s-000349.pdf

"..The thyroid hormone network has a capacity considerable to compensate for disturbances of this feedback system as it is necessary for various metabolic and catabolic reactions and development. With respect to still insufficient nutritive iodine-supply of almost one third of the world population, possible adverse flavonoid actions on the thyroid hormone axis have to be examined more closely..."
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378512206002350

"...These results indicate that in this group of healthy iodine-replete subjects, soy isoflavones do not adversely affect thyroid function..."
http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/abs/10.1089%2F109662003772519859


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