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Good diet - is that really that hard?

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 Posted 3/13/2013 2:01:56 AM
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This link is packed with good information which I am sure all of you know and hopefully agree to:

http://www.medhelp.org/cancer/slideshows/Cancer-Fighting-Diet/148/1

If I decided to post it, it's mainly because when reading (slide 16) ...

"....Imagine if you tried to run five miles, quit smoking, cut out hamburgers, andstarted your morning with yogurt all on one day. It might feel like a greatday, but the habits won't stick...."

... I wondered: how can it it be that hard ?!

Remember also, as I guess I posted elsewhere already, that wonderful read:

Anticancer, A New Way of Life
by David Servan-Schreiber, MD, who unfortunately passed away not long ago. It includes a large section on diet.



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 Posted 3/13/2013 2:43:06 AM
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albedo,

Thanks for that.

I believe that everything we need to consume be healthy and disease-free is found in nature. Consequently I believe many, if not all, of the things we consume that are detrimental to our life comes from the processing plant. Humans have figured out a way to take a natural food and adulterate in such way as to transform it from a health-giving substance into a health depleting substance. Boxed cereals come to mind as one example. Eat foods as close to the way they came from nature as possible, and you will be on the right path to health and longevity!

-Tom


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 Posted 3/13/2013 4:25:09 AM
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Absolutely agree with that!

I have to say that I am weary and wary of all those Paleo and Vegan extremists. Moderate low-carb probably is a good thing, as much as a largely plant based diet is - but the key to me is always moderation. That said, even if it would turn out one day that a strict plant based, calorie-restricted diet were the Ultima Ratio for longevity I wouldn't be willing to pay that price because for me it would deprive life of much of its joy.

If you look for the common demominator of all the conflicting diet concepts out there, it is: eat fruits and vegetables, nuts and legumes - shun processed, calorie-dense junk food. Or, as Michael Pollan put it: eat food, not too much, mostly plants. Whole food, one might add.

I think Pollans books ("The Omnivore's Dilemma", "In Defense of Food", "Food Rules") display a much needed down-to-earth approach to a healthy diet. The only quibble I have with Pollans stance, is his disregard for nutritional science. I think that both tradition, common sense (which Pollan translates to "your mother" Smile) and the scientific method must have their part in defining what a "good diet" in our modern world.

Another author who doesn't neglect the former but is more open to the scientific side and the concept of life extension is Andrew Weil ("Eating Well for Optimum Health", etc.). I also like Weil's approach to Healthy Aging as opposed to Anti-Aging - it means to maximize healthy life span while accepting mortality as a necessity of life. This seems to me like a much more relaxed attitude, so sharing it I have less stress than those who struggle for immortality and less stress means that I will probably outlive them Tongue

I enjoyed watching this public discussion with Andrew Weil, Michael Pollan and Robert Lustig (yay, three of my nutritional heroes at once!): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L9_Xik-ps94

I also have the greatest respect for the less popular scientific dilligence of researchers like Harvard's Walter Willet. The Harvard Nutrition Source is a great breakdown of his and his colleagues work for the public: http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/

When it comes to cancer specifically, "Foods to Fight Cancer" by Richard Béliveau and Denis Gingras is a great companion to book by David Servan-Schreiber. There's also a salutary website by the Angiogenesis Foundation, dedicated to promote an anti-cancer diet: http://www.eattodefeat.org/


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 Posted 12/28/2013 8:37:25 AM
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I just finished reading Margaret Cuomo's "A World Without Cancer" and the power and promize of prevention. I cannot resist to list here the diet recommendations:

Eat more fruits and vegetables (berries, cruciferous, tomatoes, dark green, leafy)
Buy organic
Eat more fiber
Eat more fish
Drink green tea
Increase your resveratrol
Flavor your food with turmeric
Avoid red meat
Limit alcohol consumption
Limit processed food

Sorry .. we know all this, yet ... are these recommendations really so hard to implement and do better for us, hence society which is going straight to hit a wall?

An interesting message of the book (an entire chapter on it): include Vitamin D as supplementation!


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 Posted 12/29/2013 11:35:30 AM
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Thanks, albedo.

D Dye


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 Posted 12/30/2013 12:53:26 AM
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You are welcome D Dye. While Mrs Cuomo is "... much more enthusiastic about whole foods and good nutrition than .. taking supplements ... " I found the section on Vitamin D (and calcium) supplementation needs very much aligned with LEF's recommendation, I admit even to my surprise with regard to dosing/target. The approaches are of course complementary and not in conflict to each other.

I highly recommend the book and possibly LEF interviewing her for one of the coming magazine issues.
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 Posted 12/30/2013 2:57:23 AM
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An optimal diet for one guy isn't necessarily optimal for the next and many of us are attempting to go 'above and beyond' our evolved genetic destiny, generally implying there are non-natural maneuvers for extending longevity, promoting health well beyond our 'natural' healthy age, performance enhancement, etc.

The true, perfect healthy diet, may be slightly different for every single one of us and varies from time to time depending on need.

There may come a day when we insert a finger into our 'nutrition center' for testing before each meal. It will evaluate our current nutritional status and like a vending machine, spit out "the perfect meal" based on our genetics and our need. IMO, until then, we're just guessing...

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 Posted 12/30/2013 5:27:48 AM
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I agree Hepo but, till then, i prefer staying in the safe side ... :-)

Of course there is a lot of promise in the personalized medicine and personalized nutrition: only in the latter and only one corporation (Nestlè) is putting huge money (Google on their NIHS)
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