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Avoiding AMD perhaps through minimizing CRP

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 Posted 3/11/2013 9:38:05 PM
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I've an interest in reducing AMD risk by minimizing C-Reactive Protein, and any action by Complement Factor H. What would be the best documented, most effective supplements to take?

There is a lot of information on LEF, but none seems to directly target these goals.

I'm guessing, Zinc, Folate, B12, TMG and possibly Butterbur or Rosemaric Acid.

Protocol-wise I'm guessing eliminating all abdominal fat if at all possible using moderate daily exercise.

Food choice-wise I'm guessing eliminating all sugars, including and especially fructose, and any potentially allergic substances like Milk and Wheat. And any personally high insulin response foods... and a moderated slower than usual eating pattern.

Testing-wise I'm guessing a high sensitivity C-reactive and cytokine panel.. but I'm not sure if a full blood panel would provide any insight to pursue these goals.

Worst case I guess it could be misguided, but I don't see any of it as potentially harmful.

Any advice would be appreciated.


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 Posted 3/12/2013 3:27:06 AM
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Post #8429
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 Posted 3/12/2013 1:08:49 PM
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Spot on..

"An evaluation of 11 population-based studies encompassing over 41,000 patients demonstrated a clear association between elevated serum CRP levels (> 3 mg/L) and the incidence of late onset AMD (Hong et al. 2011). The risk of AMD in these high-CRP patients was increased over 2-fold compared with patients with CRP levels < 1 mg /L. "

Thanks Dye!

I had not seen that series of pages, ever, and they were real page turners.

Sleep deprivation inducing IL6 was a surprise and IL6 seems to be closely related to AMD or CRP from what I can tell.

Metformin again, up to a 26% decrease, surprising. But since it does influence processes in the Liver directly perhaps it shouldn't be a surprise since that is where CRP gets made in the first place.

Green Coffee Bean extract is shaping up to be a reasonable non-prescription substitute for Metformin if I'm reading it right.
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 Posted 3/12/2013 7:51:01 PM
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Dye,

Here is a quote from an Oxford journal that suggests AMD might be attributable to high levels of C-reactive protein unchecked by a variation in a gene often found in people who have AMD.

heavily paraphrased, the original has citations and much more precise wording:

"Six independent studies have found, a particularly strong candidate gene variant is for complement factor H (CFH). CFH has an anti-inflammatory role. The polymorphism of the CFH gene, codes for a region of the protein that binds heparin and C-reactive protein. It has been hypothesized that this amino acid change decreases the affinity for these and compromises the anti-inflammatory effect of CFH. Indeed, inflammation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of AMD via increased C-reactive protein levels"

http://hmg.oxfordjournals.org/content/15/18/2784.full
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 Posted 3/13/2013 4:47:03 AM
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Interesting.
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