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Dealing with Athersclerosis in an Old Athlete

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 Posted 8/29/2013 3:02:26 PM
Spectator

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What about Pauling therapy (high dose vitamin c and lysine/proline) for plaque inside the arteries and high dose vitamin k2 45mg yes mg for the soft tissue calcifications?
http://www.paulingtherapy.com/
http://wholehealthsource.blogspot.com/2008/11/can-vitamin-k2-reverse-arterial.html



Clogged Runner (3/1/2013)
This is a post to seek input regarding how I am dealing with my cardiologists concerns.  I am a 65 years old male who has run over 70 marathons, including eleven in 2012.  I have also run many ultras, up and down Pike's Peak several times, several runs across the Grand Canyon and back, a run along the length of the Inca Trail in Peru, and many other long runs.  I also workout daily with a CrossFit gym.  In 2008 I had a triple bypass.  The triple bypass was necessary because my main arteries were 85%, 95% and 100% blocked.  I believe (my opinion only) that the real cause was 1995-2000 I had high blood pressure with cholesterol at around 200.  I allowed that to go on for those five years.  We really never did find the root cause, but it came back down to normal and has been normal since 2000.  I had just completed a marathon two weeks before surgery with a lot of angina but no heart attack.  My cardiologist said that a massive set of collarerals (developed over the years via all the training) is all that saved me.  I ran my next marathon 8 weeks after the surgery, very slowly.  Just saying that I am pretty much over the top regarding this part of my life, but it is not going to change.

The cardiologist was initially thrilled at my running, and the conditioning that came with it.  However, now he wants me to stop running.  He gives two reasons:  1) The oxidative stress associated with all the long distance training, fast paced training, and competition is quite significant and destructive, and 2) The inflamation associated with same is a major initiator of plaque buildup.  I understand his concerns, so I have the same concerns.  However, instead if caving in to them via stopping the running, I have chosen to deal with them as follows:

  1. Combat oxidative stress with antioxidants.  I take a LOT of antioxidants every day, three times a day.  These include vitamin C, CoQ10, blueberries, pomegranate concentrate, plus other antioxidant vitamins.  I do this daily, but also step it up just before and after a long run or a marathon.
  2. Combat inflamation with a combination of diet, and supplements.  The diet support is primarily making certain that I get in an apple a day and at least one large fresh salad a day.  Both of these have significant capability to reduce inflamation.  The supplement support is intake of a serrapeptase enzyme.  The one that I use called BlockBuster AllClear.  The serrapeptase enzyme goes around "eating up" inflamation.
  3. I also keep a watch on anything that could increase inflamation.  Take care of a tooth ache or a cold as close to immediately as possible.
  4. I try to get at least 7 hrs sleep a day.  I don't always succeed at that, however.
  5. The cardiologist watches my CPK.  I have learned the hard way to NOT go in to give them my blood samples immediately after a hard workout.  I did that once and CPK was about 1,500!  Otherwise it is normally at or under 200.
So, if I were a 40 year old I might look at this differently.  But at 65, I think I want to live my life a close to "my way" as I can.  If that means I only get to live to 80 instead of 90, I am OK with that.  But not running based upon my doctor's hunch that additional pluggage might happen, is just not acceptable to me.  I am not looking for any lectures here.  I am hoping for constructive comments regarding what I am doing, and what else I could do in response to the cardiologist's concerns.
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 Posted 8/30/2013 4:25:46 AM
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Welcome to the Forums, jt-me.

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Post #10069
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 Posted 8/30/2013 7:33:52 AM
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I wonder how you arrived at your nutritional preventative program? The LEF protocols for prevention from cardiovascular disease require a lot more than you are taking.  Did you just have a very limited amount of money to spend?
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 Posted 8/30/2013 12:25:05 PM
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I was an avid  marathon runner at one time and because of 3 surgeries ( 2 on one knee ) I have had to discontinue running and began cycling . Eighteen months ago I had an abnormal nuclear dye stress test . Having my cardiologist determine the cause I had a angiogram and was diagnosed with 70% calcification of my LAD . The location and calcification prevented my cardiologist from doing a stent ..too risky . As a result I am on a beta blocker ( 5 mg of Bystolic ) and 40 mg of lipitor daily . I might add I am asymtomatic , no chest pains or shortness of breath . My cardiologist will not hear of by pass at this time until I have symptoms . As you can imagine I am very anxious about working out too hard because of the diagnosis . I have workout all of my life and have run 20 plus marathons and several 100 mile bike rides . I have to believe my heavy calcification score is a result of high intensity training . I take many supplements just like Clogged Runner hoping that it will at least stop further calcification . The beta blocker has had some side effects that really has me depressed , low libido , fatigue, and it acts as a governor on my HR which I know its suppose to do . Since I am 69 and have a single vessel disease I am leaning to go to the Cleveland Clinic and get an opinion if I am a candidate for the new robotic minimal invasive surgery procedure . I know that my blockage is not going to get better . It will probably worsen . My doc does not think I should consider it .
Does anyone have an opinion ? I think its amazing the Clogged Runner did those marathons after a triple by pass . 
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 Posted 8/30/2013 12:31:46 PM
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Welcome to the Forums, marathon.
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 Posted 9/18/2013 12:14:47 AM
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Does anyone have an opinion ? I think its amazing the Clogged Runner did those marathons after a triple by pass . 


EDTA chelation or at least those Pauling style drinks (C, lysine, proline) along with a K2 complex, GliSODin and pomegranate extracts should clear up blockages over time.  Higher doses will probably speed up resolution if you're in a race of time against the money-grubbing machine.

The human body is simply not designed for endurance exercise and marathons and other extreme "aerobic" sports that ineffectively works the muscles and persists the body in a chronic catabolic state have serious long-term health consequences.  So I'm stumped as to what to tell Clogged Runner other than just take the same things above, load up on the antioxidants and pray that he minimizes the massive damage incurred.
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 Posted 10/9/2013 7:11:27 AM
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 Posted 5/5/2014 1:53:11 PM
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Clogged,

I say this rarely, however your doc is very sophisticated when it comes to the risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease.

We now know that the 3 primary risk factors that contribute to heart disease are:

Oxidative stress
Inflamation
autoimune dysfunction

Steady state cardio (like you are doing) increases

oxidative stress
inflamation
glycation

In other words, running is contributing to your disease.  It also lowers your sex hormones, increases cortisol and lowers igf-1.

Whatever you do, make sure that your maintain your homocysteine and C-reactive protein at very low levels.  Correct any hormonal imbalance and read Dr. Mark Houston's book "What your doctor won't tell you about heart disease".  His book should provide the information you need to make an informed decision.

As far as I'm concerned you can choose to do what you want.  If you just want to run, but aren't concerned about distance, ask your doc about high intensity interval training.  It's not associated with the increased risk of heart disease.  It also build lean mass and improves body composition.  Again, please check with your doc before doing this as I have no way to know if this level of intense exercise is healthy for you.
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 Posted 6/25/2014 5:57:22 AM
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Dr Mercola has posted on HIIT.  Initially he used a stationary bike but eventually started using an elliptical trainer.  His protocol is 30 seconds at 90% of maximum heart rate followed by 90 seconds of rest, done eight times.   Maximum heart rate generally is 220 minus your age.  His website has a lot of information on the benefits of HIIT. 

I've done HIIT for three years now.  Stupidly I did the HIIT on a treadmill set at 10% grade.   Eventually that caused bilateral Achilles tears.   Mercola even mentioned using a treadmill for HIIT would be a mistake.  The HIIT needs to be done once or twice a week for the maximum effects.  Because of the intensity, doing it more than twice a week greatly increases the chances of injury.   




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