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Caloric Restriction

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 Posted 3/25/2014 6:48:30 AM
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In answer to your question, one of the potential hazards associated with gelatin is TSE.

Glycine capsules are another possibility http://www.lef.org/Vitamins-Supplements/Item01669/Glycine.html 


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 Posted 3/25/2014 7:22:09 AM
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There is something I don't see mentioned here in this discussion, Intermittent Fasting.  One could use it as a form of calorie restriction - fasting on one or more days per week (consuming no more than 500 or so calories on fasting days).  Or, in my practice, I limit food intake to an 8 hour window.  This results in a fasting period of about 16 hours.  My break-fast (first meal of the day) will be around noon to 1pm.  I'm only consuming 2 meals per day.  One would need to pay strict attention to what types of food to consume.  I personally have eliminated most carbs in the form of grain based foods, potatoes, rice, many of the fruits except berries, etc..  Healthy fats have become my main energy source (fat adapted).  I have been doing this for a fees years now and fell great.  Quite a few articles on this subject (IF) can be found @ Mercola.com.
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 Posted 3/25/2014 7:22:10 AM
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Oh, yes. TSE. . .  one key reason my wife switched to vegetarian!

Gelatin from fish or poultry would cut out that risk, or at least the chance of BSE, I guess.
Gelatin is about one third glycine, by weight.
Getting glycine from fish gelatin is several times the cost of LEF's  8 cents per gram (as of this writing).
Both Sprouts Market and Whole Foods Market, at least here in Salt Lake City, do not have glycine --one clerk referred me to look at glycerine, (haha).
Another local specialty supplement store that carries an entire 8-ft tall wall filled with specialty aminos does not carry glycine and said nobody would buy it even if they did, wow.


Glycine from lef.org looks like a best bet.
Cheers for Life Extension! 



Update: pays to ask, 2 weeks after asking, all of the mentioned stores now carry glycine. Sprouts Market insisting they had it all along, just somehow couldn't produce it when I asked.  No worries, I love having an excuse to order from Life Extension, best cause/ use of profits out of all other choices.



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 Posted 3/27/2014 8:14:56 AM
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It looks like taurine is a good choice to inhibit methionine uptake.  . .

http://ajpcell.physiology.org/content/296/3/C632





P.S., I deleted my previous post about inhibiting methionine in soybean foods, that appeared to be a recipe for inhibiting methionine by glycation,  Exogenous AGEs? Eeew!



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 Posted 3/31/2014 4:33:26 AM
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Did a bit more searching for info on this avenue of calorie restriction via methionine. . .

First of all, adequate methionine in the diet is absolutely, positively essential, crucial to good health.  Any attempt at reducing methionine in the diet will be focused on excess, of course.  Protein synthesis, formation of sam-e, methylation, cell division. . . the list would go on and on.


I searched among a few dozen different commonly found sources of protein and found the amino acid profile of pea protein to be quite compelling.  A decent line-up of essential amino acids, but notably low in methionine compared to the others.



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 Posted 3/31/2014 7:14:46 AM
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Pea is a very good protein source. Peas are one of the highest rated foods for spermine and spermidine. 

However, it is considered an incomplete protein, because of its low cystine . Cystine is important, and a limiting factor in some body processes, especially in the production of glutathione.

I think hemp protein is very similar to pea with the addition of fiber and omega 3, 6 and 9.

*** Methionine is not bad as long as you take the proper supplementation to convert it from homocystine to SAMe and glutathione. This process is hindered as we age and our glandular functions become less efficient, therefore supplementation is required.

A good blood indicator is the blood test for homocystine, but additionally if you take the supplements to convert you will raise your SAMe and glutathione levels. High glutathione and SAMe levels are a good thing!
  
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 Posted 3/31/2014 9:32:17 AM
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Pea protein can be combined with other sources to improve amino acid balance.  Life Extension's adds brown rice protein http://www.lef.org/vitamins-supplements/item01587/Pure-Plant-Protein.html

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