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Why do hormones deplete with age?

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 Posted 9/17/2013 4:38:13 AM
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I'm still on the fence regarding hormone replacement and whether doing so is pro-or anti-aging.  Some past LEF articles infer it may have a pro-aging effect which should be enough to give anyone pause.

I've been practicing calorie restriction (and low carb) for a long time so naturally all of my hormones have been below optimal for a long time.  The net effect has been positive.

Low thyroid is clearly associated with longevity by association with a reduced metabolic rate.  (The earlier poster I think was referring to the thymus gland, not the thyroid.  The thymus shrinks from lack of melatonin stimulation over time.)

HGH causes IGF-1 to be released which is a growth promoter.   Cancers respond to growth promoters as well as oncogenes.

But the steroid hormones?  So long as you take care of the negative feedback loops to the HPA or spillover excess, it seems like the benefits may be worth the cost.
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 Posted 10/1/2013 9:29:31 AM
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My health conditions shaped my hypothesis. Fibromyalgia is believed to correlate with childhood trauma. Stress seems to make hormone systems malfunction earlier. I had a hellish childhood (ages 2-7). I got hormone-related problems like PMS earlier than most of my peers, developed hypothyroidism and fibro. At menopause, I had more severe symptoms. It is more unpleasant for me to adjust hormone doses than other women. Stress seems to be the root cause, though there are probably genes involved. Stress also seems to accelerate other signs of aging: disease, appearance, mental function.

There are a lot of hormones in a the body, but we don't understand all of them, and only replace a few. Increased cancer risk could be because we're not replacing something we need to replace or we get the balance wrong.

Great topic.
Elaine


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 Posted 10/10/2013 2:05:06 AM
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Yes that is correct.
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 Posted 10/10/2013 6:09:18 AM
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MachineGhost:  Low thyroid causes mental depression and is not advisable.  Antioxidants take care of the results of metabolism, which should be kept up, otherwise one will have a lack of physical and mental energy.
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 Posted 11/15/2013 6:32:56 PM
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I would posit that hormone production doesn't necessarily have to decrease as we age. Aside from pre-programmed genetic abnormalities, I think we cause all our hormone deficiences by the lifestyle we adopt. I haven't seen the evidence that any hormones decrease normally with age. That is not saying they don't, so please don't misinterpret my theory.

Examine the Tibetan culture in detail. They would make an interesting control group useful for testing my hypothesis, as if that could ever be accomplished. That will have to be left for more ambitious fellows.


peace, health, and happiness Stephen Jones http://about.me/stephenpjones
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 Posted 11/17/2013 2:26:58 PM
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Welcome to the Forums, Stephen.

D Dye
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 Posted 5/14/2014 5:05:54 AM
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Cancer is generally associated with deficient hormone levels, not optimal. 
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 Posted 5/14/2014 5:11:08 AM
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How has suboptimal hormones benefited you?
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 Posted 5/14/2014 3:42:59 PM
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There does seem to be some evidence to point to the idea that castrated males enjoy greater longevity, but it seems the benefit is only if castration occurs prior to puberty; once developed, sex hormones become necessity for optimum adult health. Way too problematic anyways.
http://maxlife.org/articles/2012/10/will-castration-extend-your-life.asp 



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 Posted 5/15/2014 6:01:56 AM
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"There does seem to be some evidence to point to the idea that castrated males enjoy greater longevity"




That doesn't sound very enjoyable to me...
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