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What is the best diet for a recovering heart attack patient?

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 Posted 4/20/2012 5:00:20
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Although I favor low fat and low carb, this can be taken too far.  If you cut out too much fat, you will not have sufficient energy to work.  And if you cut out carbohydrates too much, you will get depressed.  
Post #5755
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 Posted 5/1/2012 8:49:07 PM
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Here is a video lecture by Dr. Esselstyn (formerly of the Cleveland Clinic) talking about the very low-fat vegan diet he uses to treat heart patients. A key feature of this diet is consuming no oils.

http://www.heartattackproof.com/



You can measure the effects of a low omega-6 fatty acid, low fructose and low alcohol diet with a blood pressure monitor. It takes a couple months to see a change.



It is also possible to lower your omega-6 fatty acid consumption without a vegan diet but there are a lot of ways it can go wrong (e.g. diet of the livestock you're eating).



Here is a video lecture in which biochemist William E.M. Lands talks to a U.S. military audience about the health problems caused by the over consumption of omega-6 fatty acids in the U.S. diet.

( Longer presentation here: http://videocast.nih.gov/summary.asp?live=8108 )

Biography:

"William E.M. Lands (born July 22, 1930) is an American nutritional biochemist who is the world's foremost authority on essential fatty acids. Lands graduated from University of Michigan in 1951 and served on the faculty there from 1955 to 1980. He then moved to University of Illinois (1980-1990) and subsequently the National Institutes of Health (1990-2002), where he served as the Senior Scientific Advisor to the Director of the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. Lands is credited for discovering the beneficial effects of balancing the effects of excess omega-6 fatty acids with dietary omega-3 fatty acids. The effect of essential fatty acids on formation of hormones is documented in his book, "Fish, Omega-3 and Human Health." University of Michigan's Department of Biological Chemistry endowed a Lectureship in honor of William E.M. Lands."



A key point in his presentation is that you need to consume less omega-3 fatty acids if you consume less omega-6 fatty acids.

He has created a mathematical model to predict the omega-6 fatty acid content of tissues based upon foods in the USDA nutritional database.

part 1:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dgU3cNppzO0

part 2:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sVx0akeVHJ4

part 3:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JqL65CwkCwc

part 4:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bxqQcMZtY-I



The "Keep It Managed" software from the NIH lets you figure out the omega-6 content of your recipes.

http://efaeducation.nih.gov/sig/kim.html

Another software package that incorporated biochemist William Lands omega-6 fatty acid model:

http://nut.sourceforge.net/



A table showing the omega-6 content of some food oils:

http://efaeducation.nih.gov/sig/esstable1.html



Here is a technical description by Prof. Michal Laniado Schwartzman of how arachidonic acid (from omega-6 fatty acids in the diet) causes inflammation and hypertension:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YK-q0m9Zj7U

http://www.nymc.edu/People/Michal.L.Schwartzman/index.html



Ray Peat has a Ph.d. in biology from the University of Oregon. He outlines several problems with unsaturated oils:

http://raypeat.com/articles/articles/unsaturated-oils.shtml

The diet of livestock and poultry makes a difference in the omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acid content of their meat and lard. Livestock only fed grass (and not finished with grain) has a higher omega-3 fatty acid content.



Hydroxy-trans-2-nonenal (HNE) is a toxic compound that forms in heated unsaturated oil containing linoleic acid. Other similar toxic compounds also form. It builds up in oil that is re-heated and re-used.

http://www.hne-club.org/

http://www.irb.hr/en/research/projects/intl/euprojects/costb35/lpo/Cost_B35_material_A.pdf

http://www.reactivereports.com/45/45_2.html

http://fscn.cfans.umn.edu/people/faculty/asaaricsallany/index.htm

http://oss.mcgill.ca/everyday/hne.pdf

http://phys.org/news/2012-02-toxic-aldehydes-reheated-oil.html



Fructose and trans-fats cause liver damage.

If you have to use a sweetener and can cook with dextrose (glucose) instead of sucrose, it is healthier to use less fructose. Each sucrose (aka sugar) molecule is quickly split into a glucose and a fructose molecule by sucrase enzymes after sugar is consumed.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/hep.23797/abstract



Wheat farmers spray Roundup on wheat to harvest it earlier. It can get absorbed into the wheat kernels.

In humans, glyphosate affects glutathione via affecting cysteine.

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1382668907000208

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glutathione

Cardiologist Dr. William Davis sees a lot of heart disease patients with undiagnosed sensitivity to wheat and other grains.

Post #5874
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 Posted 5/2/2012 6:26:22
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Welcome to the Forums, Rene.

Am also an admirer of Dr Peat.

D Dye
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Post #5877
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 Posted 10/14/2012 2:50:01
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 Wow

 so many opinions, so much confusion. 

 I would say stay away from the obvious things, deep fried fatty foods from takeaways, refined, packaged foods and refined / high sugar foods. And too much caffeine other stimulants.

 Stay away from extreme diet also. The vegan diet is extreme. The cabbage soup diet is extreme... 

 Eat lots of leafy green veggies ( juice/steam/eat in salads) 
 Eat quality fish sources 3+ times per week
 Eat high quality meat. It is important to eat Quality organic, grass fed animal meats. 
 Eat lots of berries and fibrous fruits.
 Eat some root veggies
 Add high quality Raw, grass fed dairy if tolerated
 Eat high quality fats for fat soluble vitamins Olive oil, Mac nut oil, Palm oil, coconut oil. Fat soluble vitamins are very important for the heart. 

 I would eat plenty of raw foods with lightly, low heat cooked quality meats,

 That would be m y foundation, and from there you can see if you get on with some properly prepared nuts, lentils, legumes etc   I am weary of beans and legumes as i  have a predisposition for autoimmune disease
 and gout and lentils and black beans seem to really set things off. I get on ok with some 
 wild rice. The same with beans etc, and if you check with the western A price website as 
suggested before for ways to properly prepare these foods this will help, but i believe these things to be
 additional to the main core diet and only if  they are prepared well and tolerated.

 Check for real food allergies and environmental allergies. Then avoid.
 Make sure your digestive system is working and functioning as well as it can
 Look to get your nutrients from whole foods but consider / research supplementing:

 B Vitamins, especially the b vits that help keep homocysteine levels in check (Folic acid, B6 B12)
 Vit D  depending where you live and i would get blood levels tested (i think LEF do this test?) 
  Look into CoQ10
 Magnesium
 Wheat Germ Oil.
 Serrapeptase
 And even though you are eating plenty of vegetables etc I would consider a good fiber supplement twice per day as fiber is  very underrated. Again, you can do some research, I get on very well with ground  psyllium husks, and home ground flax seeds. 
 Also you might want to look into Enzymes and probiotics. 

 I would not just go ahead and supplement load things, obviously see what you are and are not 
getting from your diet.  I guess this is just another opinion so the most important thing i could say is to  start with a simple, basic whole food meal plan and add things bit by bit after research and see how these things
work.  
 
 
Post #7416
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 Posted 10/14/2012 11:24:44
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Welcome to the Forums, JGS.

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Post #7421
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 Posted 10/14/2012 3:42:51 PM
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Get the book entitled .."The Mediterranean Diet".  This is basically the diet I follow. It's healthy, flavorful, and heart-smart. Best of all you won't feel deprived, and its not gimmicky or faddish.

Read here from the Mayo Clinic:

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/mediterranean-diet/CL00011


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The case against dietary fats >>  CLICK HERE
Post #7422
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 Posted 11/30/2012 10:10:37
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I agreed that Dr. Ornish’sdiet (as described in his book Dr. Dean Ornish’s Program for Reversing Heart Disease: The Only System Scientifically Proven to Reverse Heart Disease Without Drugs or Surgery) is one of the better ones out there.  But I have 2 criticisms of this diet: 1) Ornish doesn’t distinguish between good fats and bad fats (it is clear that oil from cold water fish is good for your cardiovascular system), and 2) this diet is hard for most people to stick with.

 

There’s nothing wrong with getting a blood panel done, but the standard panel does not include the most important number: Lipoprotein A [Lp(a)]. Lp(a), a very sticky form of LDL cholesterol and is the only number that has any predictive validity with regard to heart attack risk (the higher thenumber, the higher the risk).  Remember that cholesterol, triglycerides, C-reactive protein, homocysteine, etc. do not cause heart disease; they are symptoms of heart disease.  There is no point in treating the symptoms when you know what the cause is (multiple nutritional deficiencies) and can easily remedy it.    

 

It is not a theory that arteriosclerosis is caused by multiple nutritional deficiencies, it is a fact.  I have on my computer several hundred papers published in peer-reviewed journals that prove this beyond any doubt.  These deficiencies prevent the arteries from repairing the inevitable damage caused by mechanical and oxidative stress.  The body responds by laying down plaque in order to prevent the arteries from leaking.  This process can be reversed by correcting the cause of the problem: the nutritional deficiencies.  You must replace each of the missing nutrients and do so with therapeutic doses of each nutrient.  Once you have replaced the missing nutrients your body will rebuild the arteries to their normal strong and flexible state.  Since the plaque is no longer needed to prevent your arteries from leaking, your body uses natural processes to remove the plaque. 

 

As far a chelation therapy is concerned: I can guarantee you that you did not get heart disease because of a nutritional deficiency of EDTA!

 

Ray Ellis

SaveYourHeart.com

  


Ray Ellis
Post #7748
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 Posted 11/30/2012 10:24:41
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You have some valid points, Ray, except for the last one.  Not every disease or condition is caused by nutritional deficiency. 

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Post #7749
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 Posted 11/30/2012 10:46:53
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Did I say EVERY condition or disease is caused by a nutritional dificiency?  I merely made the point that arteriosclerosis is caused by multiple nutritional deficiencies. 

Ray Ellis

SaveYourHeart.com


Ray Ellis


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 Posted 11/30/2012 10:59:28
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Agreed, you did not say that.

Perhaps my point is poorly worded.

Am calling into question the statement, often heard among natural health enthusiasts, that a particular non-nutritional treatment is not useful because one can't have a deficiency of that treatment.  For example, those that say aspirin isn't helpful for heart disease because one doesn't have an aspirin deficiency, or that EDTA isn't helpful because one doesn't have a deficiency of EDTA.  These can be useful therapies, in my opinion, although they have their dangers, like anything else. 
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