Life Extension Forums




What is the best diet for a recovering heart attack patient?

Author Message
 Posted 11/30/2012 2:36:50 PM
Participant

ParticipantParticipantParticipantParticipantParticipantParticipantParticipantParticipantParticipant

Status: Member
Group: Forum Members
Last Login: 7/29/2013 5:57:31 AM
Posts: 10, Visits: 165
I'm a simple guy, so here's how I explain it to myself:  I’ve got scurvy.  I go into the doctor’s officeand she correctly diagnoses me with scurvy. If she tells me to get more Vitamin C, she has done the appropriate thing because the only way to correct a nutritional deficiency disorder is to provide the missing nutrient.  If she writes me a script for Lipitor or offers me EDTA chelation, she is engaging inmalpractice because the only way to correct a nutritional deficiency disorder is to provide the missing nutrient.  If for some reason the missing nutrient is unavailable (marooned on a desert island?), I suppose using something else would be warranted even though it would not correct the problem.  Buy why use something else when vitamin C is cheap and easily available without a prescription?  I believe almost all MDs would agree with me on this point.

This is obvious when discussing scurvy.  The problem occurs when MDs don’t recognize arteriosclerosis as a multiple nutritional deficiency disorder even though that is what the scientific evidence clearly shows.  Treating symptoms will never fix the problem.  Has the medical approach worked?  Have the medical treatment protocols made heart disease something less that the number one killer disease in the industrialized world? 

I don’t see why it is hard to understand that when you have a nutritional deficiency that is causing a problem, you correct the problem by getting enough of the missing nutrient.  I’m in my tenth year of explaining this to people (even MDs) and find that the problem is not understanding how to treat a nutritional deficiency but understanding that arteriosclerosis is, in reality, a multiple nutritional deficiency disorder.  Because of this I have written a rather long essay that touches on all the major medical research in this area dating back to the 1519.  It’s about 40 pages long.  I don’t know if the moderator would allow me to post something that long.  The essay is also on my website, but since I sell a product on that site, I don’t know if posting the link would be allowed either. I will let the moderator decide what I should do.

Ray Ellis

SaveYourHeart.com        

 


Ray Ellis


Post #7752
Add to Twitter Add to Facebook
 Posted 11/30/2012 6:38:05 PM
Forum Associate

Forum AssociateForum AssociateForum AssociateForum AssociateForum AssociateForum AssociateForum AssociateForum AssociateForum Associate

Status: Regular Customer
Group: Contributors
Last Login: 15 hours ago
Posts: 1,845, Visits: 2,047
One caveat regarding the last discussion above. When referring to prescription drugs for example, one wouldn't be taking Lipitor because one is deficient in Atorvastatin. One is taking it because there is something else causing their high cholesterol. In other words, doctors don't necessarily get to the cause, but treat the symptom for a lifetime. Often patents alleviate or cure their condition by lifestyle change but doctors refuse to take them off the medication.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Seize every opportunity to put your best foot forward.

Anything worth doing is worth doing well.
If you don't stand for something, you will fall for anything
If it seems easy you're not trying hard enough.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The case against dietary fats >>  CLICK HERE
Post #7753
Add to Twitter Add to Facebook
 Posted 12/5/2012 5:08:59 PM
Participant

ParticipantParticipantParticipantParticipantParticipantParticipantParticipantParticipantParticipant

Status: Member
Group: Forum Members
Last Login: 7/29/2013 5:57:31 AM
Posts: 10, Visits: 165

Excellent observation!  MDs use the high numbers as the justification to put their patients on statins.  But low numbers, well into the normal range,are NOT justification to stop – or even reduce the dosage.  The stats on the effectiveness of lifestyle change are out there for all to see and most good MDs at least give lip service to diet and exercise (but, strangely, ignore supplements).  Yet they don’t have enough faith in this approach to really give it a try.    

 

I tell my customers that I can’t advise them to stop taking prescribed drugs.  But I do tell them this salient truth: Your body belongs to you.  You, therefore must take responsibility for what you put into it and what you do not put into it.  Educate yourself and make your own decisions. 

 

Ray Ellis

SaveYourHeart.com  



Ray Ellis


Post #7783
Add to Twitter Add to Facebook
 Posted 1/1/2013 11:53:09 PM
Spectator

SpectatorSpectatorSpectatorSpectatorSpectatorSpectatorSpectatorSpectatorSpectator

Status: Member
Group: Forum Members
Last Login: 9/30/2013 1:05:19 PM
Posts: 5, Visits: 215

Yes I agree.  After my husband started having chest  tightness, then to a cardio guy, and then a stent… I hit the computer formore info, here at LEF and found the 17 factors.  Yes his doctor is like the others with the ‘cookie  cutter’ method of giving the popular drugs however I wanted to know what was  behind his problem, since his cholesterol numbers were not over the top, as opposed to the ‘band aid’ treatment.   Found a wellness doctor and she has done so many tests, including the Berkeley Heart Lab. As it turns out he does have a vitamin C issue and he’s been taking  every  day, but now we’re working on building it up to 6,000 a day.  His estradiol was high and his thyroid was off a bit, with a cortisol issue.  And the Berkeley test also showed that his small particles were high and his niacin was low, so he’s getting extra too.  I now give him testosterone, (to help bring down the estradiol) and B-12 injection each week.  Lipitor was a nightmare and she took him off it because of the adverse side effects, which has made a huge difference.  He may need to be on a statin if his small particles don’t improve but Lipitor is horrible  and his memory was gone, plus he had some chest issues but after 2 weeks of being off that drug, those went away too. (And the scary thing is these effects were immediate and he was only on the drug for a couple of months.)   No wheat diet, almond milk, grass feed beef, but limit that.  This diet is hard for me because I want to eat more but feel guilty.  Plus he needs to lose a little weight and I can’t afford to be smaller. 



Tags:
Post #7958
Add to Twitter Add to Facebook
 Posted 1/7/2013 12:33:32 PM
Spectator

SpectatorSpectatorSpectatorSpectatorSpectatorSpectatorSpectatorSpectatorSpectator

Status: Expired Member
Group: Forum Members
Last Login: 1/7/2013 12:25:06 PM
Posts: 2, Visits: 2
I am a new member, joining today, 1/7/13.

I am getting the book "Forks Over Knives" which discusses a plant based diet; and also I eat fish and chicken. 
Post #8001
Add to Twitter Add to Facebook
 Posted 1/7/2013 12:38:25 PM
Spectator

SpectatorSpectatorSpectatorSpectatorSpectatorSpectatorSpectatorSpectatorSpectator

Status: Expired Member
Group: Forum Members
Last Login: 1/7/2013 12:25:06 PM
Posts: 2, Visits: 2
I have atrial fibrilation along with heart disease issues (congestive heart failure left).  I am on the mend hopefully after 2 years.  I am mostly a vegetarian and I am reading "Forks over Knives" and will cut out red meat, leaving fish and chicken and beans as a main protein.  Is there anyone out there that perhaps has similar issues; and I work out 3 times a week and walk daily.  (There are 3 types of AFib; I am in the middle wherein it is not persistent.

Thank you.
Post #8002
Add to Twitter Add to Facebook
 Posted 1/7/2013 12:45:11 PM
Forum Coordinator

Forum Coordinator

Status: LE Employee
Group: Managers
Last Login: 6 hours ago
Posts: 1,868, Visits: 6,921
Welcome to the Forums, Martee.

Have just read the results of a meta-analysis which concluded that omega-3 fatty acids help protect against heart failure.  Since you consume fish, you might want to make sure that they are of the oily variety, which contain EPA and DHA omega-3 fatty acids.

D Dye
Modertor


Tags:
Post #8003
Add to Twitter Add to Facebook
 Posted 9/24/2013 2:30:42 AM
Participant

ParticipantParticipantParticipantParticipantParticipantParticipantParticipantParticipantParticipant

Status: Regular Customer
Group: Forum Members
Last Login: 12/12/2013 12:52:55 AM
Posts: 22, Visits: 25
Eat more vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and legumes and you need to Choose fat calories wisely. You need to eat variety with right intake of proteins.
Post #10397
Add to Twitter Add to Facebook
 Posted 9/24/2013 4:41:17 AM
Influential Poster

Influential PosterInfluential PosterInfluential PosterInfluential PosterInfluential PosterInfluential PosterInfluential PosterInfluential PosterInfluential Poster

Status: Member
Group: Forum Members
Last Login: 6 hours ago
Posts: 528, Visits: 3,392
I would suggest taking niacin and L-arginine and L-ornithine. 
Post #10404
Add to Twitter Add to Facebook
 Posted 9/24/2013 11:10:48 PM
Enthusiast

EnthusiastEnthusiastEnthusiastEnthusiastEnthusiastEnthusiastEnthusiastEnthusiastEnthusiast

Status: Expired Member
Group: Forum Members
Last Login: 1/22/2014 9:35:36 PM
Posts: 45, Visits: 670
It's kind of both funny and sad at the same time how such a simple question inevitably brings up the ideological dispute between proponents of Paleo/Low-Carb and Plant-Based diets. How about leaving the ideology aside for once and looking at the evidence?

This means that on the one hand we have to discount the particular experience of practitioners like Esselstyn and Ornish, which - regardless of their scientific merits - are clearly ideologically opposed to animal products, and on the other hand that we also have to discount the naturalist speculations of Paleo-preachers like Cordain or Atkins.

If we instead look at the evidence coming from large-scale, international epidemiological studies as well as well-done randomized controlled trials, there shouln't be much room left for legitimate dispute. They all suggest that a largely plant based, moderate to high carb, whole food diet - which sustained the world's most long-lived populations in the Mediterranean (particlary Greece and the Island of Krete) an South-East-Asian world (particulary Okinawa, the southernmost prefecture of Japan) - is the kind of diet most effective for longevity and the prevention of chronic desease.

The basic
Mediterranean diet goes like this: plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables, herbs and spices, nuts and legumes, whole grains, fish (esp. fatty varieties), olive oil, wine and moderate amounts of dairy (esp. yogurt and cheese) and lean meat. The Okinawa diet looks pretty similar, however, it includes canola (rape seed) oil instead of olive oil and substitutes whole grains for starchy tubers and wine for green tea. Additionally, it features plenty of soy foods (esp. tofu and natto), mushrooms and seaweed. Here is - in more abstract terms - what both diets generally have in common:
  • An abundance of phytonutrients, especially flavonoids.
  • A high intake of fiber, soluble and insoluble
  • About half of total calories in the form of complex, unrefined carbohydrates
  • Low amounts of saturated and high amounts of monounsaturated fat
  • A balance of Omega-6 and Omega-3 plant fats (between 1:1 and 4:1)
  • Additional long-chain Omega-3 from fish.
For an in-depth characterization of the traditional diets of Krete and Okinawa and how they compare, you may want to read these two seminal scientific papers on the subject (it is interesting to notice that the authors have a quite different approach: the Willcox emphasize the plant based nature of the Okinawa diet while Simopoulos argues that the Greek diet resembles a paleolithic dietary pattern - yet both come to essentially consistent conclusions):

Simopoulos AP. The Mediterranean diets: what is so special about the diet of Greece? The scientific evidence. J Nutr 2001;131:3065S-73S.

Willcox D.C., Willcox B.J., Todoriki H., Suzuki M. The Okinawan diet: Health implications of a low-calorie, nutrient-dense, antioxidant-rich dietary pattern low in glycemic load. J. Am. Coll. Nutr. 2009;28:500S–516S. 

The striking similarities between those diets have prompted some practitioners and researches to propose the concept of a fusion-style "MediterrAsian" diet, in order to combine their benefits (and even augment them with supplements). See this up-to-date paper by Pallauf et al. on the longevity-enhancing components of such a diet rich in "sirtfoods", or the Anti-Inflammatory Diet promoted by Andrew Weil. This is also pretty much in agreement with the dietary advice given by the Life Extension Foundation.
Post #10413
Add to Twitter Add to Facebook


Similar Topics

Expand / Collapse

Reading This Topic

Expand / Collapse