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Homocysteine Resist - lower dose of B6

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 Posted 2/18/2012 12:30:21 PM
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I just noticed LEF has reduced the B6 content of this formulation (from 750mg to 250mg). I feel more comfortable with it. I would have reduced still further though and might reconsider the product. Also methylcobalamin might have been a better choice? Happy with the folate choice. This was also discussed in the old Forum, HERE.

LEF warns: "... Do not use this product if your homocysteine levels are at or below acceptable levels. Consuming more than 2000 mg of vitamin B6 daily can result in loss of muscle coordination, tingling sensations in the extremities, and degeneration of nerve tissue. Similar effects may be experienced if more than 200-300 mg of B6 is consumed per day over the course of months or years, especially if taken without other B complex vitamins. Consult your physician before using this product if you are taking levodopa (L-dopa)..."


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 Posted 2/19/2012 3:54:36 PM
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Methylcobalamin is best absorbed sublingually.

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 Posted 2/20/2012 12:55:22 PM
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Sorry DDye I am missing your point.... I referred to the B6 content in the formulation, not B12. I perfectly agree with you on B12 methylcobalamin better absorbed as sublingual.
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 Posted 2/20/2012 1:08:31 PM
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albedo,

He probably got confused by you writing "Also methylcobalamin might have been a better choice?" or perhaps you are the one confused? :-)

He didn't address your B6 comment obviously.

From what I have seen it appears the issues caused by B6 may be related to it depleting copper, but I am unsure, as the symptoms are similar to low copper.
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 Posted 2/20/2012 1:08:59 PM
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Most of your post appeared to be your own commentary, and your one question was, "Also methylcobalamin might have been a better choice?"  Since the methylcobalamin form of B12 is better absorbed under the tongue, it is available as a sublingual tablet, and the form of B12 in this oral formula is cyanocobalamin.  If you have another question, please let me know. 

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 Posted 2/20/2012 10:06:27 PM
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I reply to DDye: yes, I only had a comment on B6 which I would have liked to be lower in the formulation. Yes, I agree your replied to my question on B12.
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 Posted 2/21/2012 8:48:44 AM
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fwiw, I have been taking over 300mg/day B6 for well over a year with no noticeable negative effects. I switched to 300mg/day P5P (active B6) a few months ago which seemed to work better for me. I don't take B6 in isolation though and get frequent blood tests, so if anything were to start slipping I would have already corrected for it, possibly without realizing it was from B6. One thing I did notice is that active B6 appears to cause iron to be used much more effectively, so I started taking Iron 40mg/day, which kept it around the center of the normal range.

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 Posted 2/22/2012 10:33:48 AM
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calc (2/21/2012)
...One thing I did notice is that active B6 appears to cause iron to be used much more effectively, so I started taking Iron 40mg/day, which kept it around the center of the normal range.

Do you have normal ferritin?
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 Posted 2/22/2012 3:47:16 PM
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I haven't tested my ferritin recently, so I'm not sure, serum iron dropped quickly after taking p5p though, it had been above midrange even without taking any iron prior to taking p5p.
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 Posted 2/26/2012 12:08:51 AM
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I was reconsidering the product when I found this study, possibly re-comforting me not to be obsessed by homocysteine and being cautious with massive folate supplementation (with possible increase of cancer risks)

http://www.plosmedicine.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pmed.1001177

"... What Do These Findings Mean?These analyses of unpublished datasets are consistent with lifelong moderate elevation of homocysteine levels having no significant effect on CHD risk. In other words, these findings indicate that circulating homocysteine levels within the normal range are not causally related to CHD risk. The meta-analysis of the randomized trials of folate supplementation also supports this conclusion. So why is there a discrepancy between these findings and those of meta-analyses of published Mendelian randomization studies? The discrepancy is too large to be dismissed as a chance finding, suggest the researchers, but could be the result of publication bias—some studies might have been prioritized for publication because of the positive nature of their results whereas the unpublished datasets used in this study would not have been affected by any failure to publish null results. Overall, these findings reveal a serious example of publication bias and argue against the use of folate supplements as a means of reducing CHD risk..."


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