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Glucophage (Metformin) Prescription?

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 Posted 4/8/2013 3:32:34 AM
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*"If you’re following a low-carb diet, fasting blood sugars in the 90s and even low 100s may not be a problem, provided your A1c and post-meal blood sugars are within the normal range." 

*Why your normal blood sugar isn't normal (part 2):
Post #8638
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 Posted 4/10/2013 1:00:46 PM
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AMPK activation has been connected to Alzheimers, not only Muscle loss, but Brain cell loss as well

 the findings suggest the need for further safety studies on an existing drug, metformin.

Metformin, a popular treatment for Type 2 Diabetes, causes AMPK activation


http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-unravels-central-mystery-alzheimer-disease.html

Berberine and Gold Seal also activate AMPK.. too much of a good thing I guess
the findings suggest the need for further safety studies on an existing drug, metformin. Metformin, a popular treatment for Type 2 Diabetes, causes AMPK activation.

Read more at: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-unravels-central-mystery-alzheimer-disease.html#jCphttp://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-unravels-central-mystery-alzheimer-disease.html

the findings suggest the need for further safety studies on an existing drug, metformin. Metformin, a popular treatment for Type 2 Diabetes, causes AMPK activation.

Read more at: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-unravels-central-mystery-alzheimer-disease.html#jCp" the findings suggest the need for further safety studies on an existing drug, metformin. Metformin, a popular treatment for Type 2 Diabetes, causes AMPK activation."

Berberine and Golden Seal also activate AMPK

Too much of a good thing again.
the findings suggest the need for further safety studies on an existing drug, metformin. Metformin, a popular treatment for Type 2 Diabetes, causes AMPK activation.

Read more at: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-unravels-central-mystery-alzheimer-disease.html#jCp
the findings suggest the need for further safety studies on an existing drug, metformin. Metformin, a popular treatment for Type 2 Diabetes, causes AMPK activation.

Read more at: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-04-unravels-central-mystery-alzheimer-disease.html#jCp
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 Posted 4/23/2013 11:30:38 AM
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Here is another meta study on the correlation between metformin and Alzheimer's.

Metformin, Other Antidiabetic Drugs, and Risk of Alzheimer's Disease




Results As compared with nonusers, long-term users of 60 or more metformin prescriptions were at greater risk of developing AD (adjusted OR (AOR) = 1.71, 95% CI = 1.12–2.60), but there was no consistent trend with increasing number of prescriptions. Long-term use of other antidiabetic drugs such as sulfonylureas (AOR = 1.01, 95% CI = 0.72–1.42), thiazolidinediones (AOR = 0.87, 95% CI = 0.31–2.40), or insulin (AOR = 1.01, 95% CI = 0.58–1.73) was not related to an altered risk of developing AD.

Conclusion Long-term use of sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones, or insulin was not associated with an altered risk of developing AD. There was a suggestion of a slightly higher risk of AD in long-term users of metformin.


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 Posted 4/27/2013 2:28:19 PM
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I empathize with the sentiment of this topic of trying to obtain a prescription for Metformin. My physician, who is a LEF member and has read all of the LEF articles about Metformin, and has diagnosed me with certain symptoms that would indicate Metformin is warranted for me. . . yet still, he insists I "wait a few years" before giving me any prescription for it.

Which brings up a complaint I often have about the general difficulty of obtaining prescriptions.  Why do so many doctors take on the role of gatekeeper over prescriptions with so much caution, even when such caution seems quite excessive? 

For instance, I routinely used a ketoconazole shampoo (Nizoral) back when it was available without a prescription to treat a scalp condition. It worked great and I was sad to see it disappear from store shelves as an OTC medication. 5 years ago and three doctors ago, I started asking for a shampoo prescription to no avail. . . nobody would give me a prescription for the shampoo, outright refusal, no amount of arguments or pleading worked, we're talking about shampoo here, SHAMPOO! 
My new doctor just recently gave me a prescription for the shampoo, but why was I refused the 11+ other doctor visits at the previous clinic I used to attend?. . . and (relevant to this topic) . . .
why are medicines like Metformin so hard to obtain even when the risk profile is so small?

Instead of relying on Metformin, I've decided to add more exercise and take turmeric, and who knows, perhaps I'm  better off for it; still, I'm irritated at this system that denies me medications even as an informed consumer for the sake of caution that feels excessive.  



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 Posted 5/12/2013 6:06:59 PM
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I am new to the Forum.  I just recently started taking Metformin for weight loss.  My body was holding on to the weight, and my doctor felt that I was insulin resistant and prescribed the drug.  Since I started taking the drug, I have lost five pounds in a very short time.  I also have experienced some back and joint pain as well as a little hyper feeling.  I was wondering if anyone knows whether this is a typical reaction to the drug?

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 Posted 5/13/2013 4:07:27 AM
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As mentioned in the other thread, muscle pain and flu syndrome are among the less common side effects associated with metformin.  A list of possible effects at www.drugs.com does not include hyperactivity or excitability, but it is possible that those feelings could be related to hypoglycemia, although one would have to confirm that by measuring one's glucose while in that state. 

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 Posted 5/13/2013 12:20:50 PM
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My Mom is on Metformin. Water imbalance and Sleep anomalies are very common when starting and figuring out the most efficient dosage.

Now that we know more about the actual mechanisms of Metformin action. It seems to have widespread influence throughout the body, and maybe not as safe as once thought long term.

The Insulin "Cycle" is of great interest to me these days. The double release of reserve insulin crystals followed by the periodic "squirts?", the "memory effect" based on size of the last meal. The white cells attempting to compensate by ingesting excess glucose leading to a followup release of more glucose from the Liver, due to a missing signaling marker in the blood.

Its a complex orchestra which we seem to have a lot more control over than we ever realized.

I'm not sure drugs will ever be enough. Ironically it may come down to learning to control ourselves and the cycles. Things like eating dessert last, never eating a carb in isolation from other things to mask and reduce the glycemic impact. Patterning meals based on activity level. Recognizing metabolic syndrome could be the result of an accumulation of bad incidents over a long period of time... or gut bacteria profiling towards a disease state.

The drugs that we have seem to be simple "knobs" rather like Aspirin to a Headache.. we barely understood and were used in proxy to make life better.. but not necessarily longer.

I would never advocate going off medication. But definite gradual changes in behavior, could over time be very significant.
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 Posted 5/13/2013 8:21:36 PM
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Thanks, very helpful, john46. 
Looking online, I noticed that Metformin is available in several areas of the world in 250 mg. tablets, some seeming to appear with a score-mark to allow a half dosage of even that, wonder if low-dose would be an option for a relatively healthy adult simply wishing to further improve insulin sensitivity or if better not to take at all?  Maybe at that point, better to rely on the similar effects of herbals like turmeric, goldenseal, or olive leaf if additional interventions are sought (once diet and exercise have done all they can do) ? 




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 Posted 6/2/2013 4:33:27 AM
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Those are alternatives.

If you really want to go the AMPK activation route. Berberine appears to be as effective if not more so than metformin, and a lot easier to obtain without a prescription, for a lot less money. Just beware that not a lot is known about its side effects, especially long term.

Berberine

I don't see LE carrying it in a concentrated form.

Thorne Research has it in two forms, Bererine and Berberine Cap. The difference being a concentrated form or a whole plant form. The concentrated form is a little more expensive, but closer to what has actually been used in the studies to date.

Don't forget to look at this short list in your research:

Curcumin
Astragalus
Resveratol
R-alpha-lipoic acid
Acetyl-l-cartinine
L-carnosine
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 Posted 8/8/2013 2:31:00 PM
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I was having the problem that my blood sugar was highest in the mornings when I would awake. I had mentioned this to my doctor before but this time he listened and told me that I needed to take (some of) my Metformin at night. I asked wouldn't I be endanger of my blood sugar getting too low while I am asleep when I might not be able to notice the problem. He said no, so i tried it. Metformin as I understands works on the liver, reducing it's natural function to keep your blood sugar up when it would naturally be low (in the morning). When you sleep you are of course not eating (unless you sleep walk) and by the time you awake in the morning your blood sugar could be bottoming out if it was for one of the liver's little roles. By taking half of my Metformin at night my over active liver dumping glucose in my blood is calmed down and my morning blood sugars are much lower and if that is not enough my over all blood sugar control has now gradually and greatly improved too. Metformin at night made all the difference. Note taken on a empty stomach is a bad idea, I also don't lay down for 30 minute, If I stay up and moving so will the pill and not get stuck in one spot and upset my stomach.
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