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Joint pain caused by resveratrol?

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 Posted 10/27/2011 6:57:05 PM
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Is the source of the resveratrol a variable? Knotweed vs muscadine grapes?
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 Posted 10/28/2011 4:03:18 AM
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Yes.  Life Extension's resveratrol contains trans-resveratrol from Polygonum cuspidatum extract (root) and whole red grape (Vitis vinifera) extract.

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 Posted 10/28/2011 12:47:28 PM
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I have read that some people have gastric problems with knotweed and wondered if all the cases of joint pain happened to people taking that source of resveratrol.  I take Neocell resveratrol, which is only sourced from grapes.
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 Posted 10/30/2011 10:02:12 AM
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COQ10 (10/23/2011)
Albedo,

We now have Krill oil for inflammation!!!

r

Yes I know that COQ10 (btw there is an interesting article on this in the last LEF magazine). Have you any particular experience you can report on using krill? I might give a try maybe with my wife who suffers of osteoarthritis (OA) in her hands. We are very carefully about inflammatory nutrients and regularly check blood CRP which plummeted since we take care (not sure though if CRP is good indicator of inflammation due to OA). Thank you for your suggestion.


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 Posted 10/31/2011 3:35:03 AM
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DDye (10/28/2011)
Yes.  Life Extension's resveratrol contains trans-resveratrol from Polygonum cuspidatum extract (root) and whole red grape (Vitis vinifera) extract.


I was most recently taking the NOW Foods resveratrol, which, according to its label, is derived from the same sources as the LEF resveratrol. After stopping it for 2 days, my knee pain was reduced by about half, and after a week of abstinence, overall aches and pains are down by about two thirds. My knees, which had seemed swollen, have now returned to normal, and this morning I was able to do a deep knee bend for the first time in more than a year.
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 Posted 11/9/2011 1:18:35 PM
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Hello. I'm new here and I didn't like the fact that the use of resveratrol can cause anemia as a side effect. Is that real? Or only coincidence? I'm taking trans resveratrol- 400mg per day - for almost 6 months. My parents are also taking the same amount too and none of us have experienced anything wrong at all until now. But why it would cause anemia?? I would like to understand how it happens. The fisiology behind it. If someone could give any information, I'd apreciate a lot. Thank you. Ana 
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 Posted 11/9/2011 10:37:24 PM
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DDye,
As the "editor" do you laugh, sigh, or shrug your shoulders and wonder why? Wink
-Tom


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 Posted 11/10/2011 2:01:54 AM
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APMLARA (11/9/2011)
Hello. I'm new here and I didn't like the fact that the use of resveratrol can cause anemia as a side effect. Is that real? Or only coincidence? I'm taking trans resveratrol- 400mg per day - for almost 6 months. My parents are also taking the same amount too and none of us have experienced anything wrong at all until now. But why it would cause anemia?? I would like to understand how it happens. The fisiology behind it. If someone could give any information, I'd apreciate a lot. Thank you. Ana 


Even grape juice can cause a problem:

"The same antioxidant compounds in dark grape juice that are noted for their health benefits in fighting heart disease may have a downside, according to new research in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. In cell studies, scientists with the U.S. Department of Agriculture and Cornell University found that polyphenols in purple (also called red) grape juice can inhibit the uptake of iron, which could increase the risk of iron-deficiency anemia...

"Dark grape juice reduced iron availability by 67 percent, while prune juice produced a 31 percent reduction. Light-colored juices, on the other hand, actually had the opposite effect; they increased iron uptake. Pear juice produced the highest uptake levels, followed by apple, orange, grapefruit and white grape juices."

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/12/021213062321.htm

So it might be wise to take resveratrol and a multi-mineral supplement on alternate days. And if you've had a problem with anemia, you might want to avoid formulations with quercetin, which is an iron chelator and is in the LEF capsule formulations.

If you look at the Longevinex brand formulation, you'll see this, in part:

Quercetin: Iron chelator

Resveratrol: Copper chelator, controls iron via hemeoxygenase . . .

Rice Bran Phytate: Iron, copper chelator. Anti-calcifying agent.




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 Posted 11/10/2011 4:27:04 AM
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A modest reduction in iron levels could be a good thing according to the studies referenced below. In answer to AMPLARA, am not aware of any studies that have demonstrated that resveratrol causes anemia in its users.  If it can have this effect as noted in an earlier post, it's not common.

One study http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19409912 even concludes, "Resveratrol is a potent inhibitor of suicidal erythrocyte death during energy depletion, oxidative stress and isoosmotic cell shrinkage. The nutrient could thus counteract anemia and impairment of microcirculation under conditions with excessive eryptosis."

Yearly or twice yearly blood testing will uncover anemia if one is concerned about the possibility.  Resveratrol is consumed by me daily and my iron level has been normal, even with a vegetarian diet.

1. Salonen JT, Nyyssonen K, Korpela H, Tuomilehto J, Seppanen R, Salonen R. High stored iron levels are associated with excess risk of myocardial infarction in eastern Finnish men. Circulation. 1992 Sep;86(3):803-811.

2. Wells BJ, Mainous AG 3rd, King DE, Gill JM, Carek PJ, Geesey ME. The combined effect of transferrin saturation and low density lipoprotein on mortality. Fam Med. 2004 May;36(5):324-9.

3. Klipstein-Grobusch K, Grobbee DE, den Breeijen JH, Boeing H, Hofman A, Witteman JC. Dietary iron and risk of myocardial infarction in the Rotterdam Study. Am J Epidemiol. 1999 Mar 1;149(5):421-8

4. van der A DL, Peeters PH, Grobbee DE, Marx JJ, van der Schouw YT. Dietary haem iron and coronary heart disease in women. Eur Heart J. 2005 Feb;26(3):257-62.

5. Tuomainen TP, Punnonen K, Nyyssönen K, Salonen JT. Association between body iron stores and the risk of acute myocardial infarction in men. Circulation. 1998 Apr 21;97(15):1461-6.

6. Tzonou A, Lagiou P, Trichopoulou A, Tsoutsos V, Trichopoulos D. Dietary iron and coronary heart disease risk: a study from Greece. Am J Epidemiol. 1998 Jan 15;147(2):161-6.

7. Alissa EM, Ahmed WH, Al-Ama N, Ferns GA. Relationship between indices of iron status and coronary risk factors including diabetes and the metabolic syndrome in Saudi subjects without overt coronary disease. J Trace Elem Med Biol. 2007 21(4):242-54.

8. Pierre F, Tache S, Petit CR, Van der Meer R, Corpet DE. Meat and cancer: haemoglobin and haemin in a low-calcium diet promote colorectal carcinogenesis at the aberrant crypt stage in rats. Carcinogenesis. 2003 Oct;24(10):1683-90.

9. Stevens RG, Graubard BI, Micozzi MS, Neriishi K, Blumberg BS. Moderate elevation of body iron level and increased risk of cancer occurrence and death. Int J Cancer. 1994 Feb 1;56(3):364-9.

10. Mainous AG 3rd, Gill JM, Everett CJ. Transferrin saturation, dietary iron intake, and risk of cancer. Ann Fam Med. 2005 Mar-Apr;3(2):131-7.

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12. Moyo VM, Makunike R, Gangaidzo IT, et al. African iron overload and hepatocellular carcinoma. Eur J Haematol. 1998 60:28–34.

13. Thompson KJ, Shoham S, Connor JR. Iron and neurodegenerative disorders. Brain Res Bull. 2001 55:155–64.

14. Sian-Hülsmann J, Mandel S, Youdim MB, Riederer P. The relevance of iron in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. J Neurochem. 2011 Sep;118(6):939-57.

15. Jeong SY, Rathore KI, Schulz K, Ponka P, Arosio P, David S. Dysregulation of iron homeostasis in the CNS contributes to disease progression in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. J Neurosci. 2009 Jan 21;29(3):610-9.

16. Weinberg ED. Iron loading: a risk factor for osteoporosis. BioMetals. 2006 19:633–5.

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 Posted 11/12/2011 3:16:02 PM
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Lately I've been on a sulfur kick and have run into sulfur's effect on healthy joints. Perhaps the resveratrol is depleting sulfur levels in some way. Could be it prevents it from being absorbed properly or chelates it. Could be that it is directed somewhere else and away from the joints.

Noticing that some have joint problems and many have alleviated those problems to some degree with MSM it might be worth looking at.


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