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Aging & Glycation, measuring results with Carnosine, Glucosepane

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 Posted 9/29/2011 4:40:04 PM
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Hi, I've been particularly interested in glycation and AGE, which seems to lead to a wide range of aging effects.   Does anyone know what types of glycation can be reduced with carnosine (or other LEF recommended anti-glycation agents, pyridoxamine, Alpha Lipoic Acid, Benfotiamine)?  

I've heard about glucosepane, which seems to be the most serious form of AGE (10 to 1000 times higher levels in tissue than other AGEs).  Wondering if carnosine or other supplements (or even experimental drugs) have been effective in reducing, blocking, or reversing it?

Also, more generally, does anyone know how effective supplements (carnosine, etc) are at reducing glycation?  I think the easiest way to measure this is the HA1c test.  I've taken the test and found my readings in the normal healthy range, but I had already been on the Mitochondria Energy Optimizer formula for a year.  Studies would be ideal, but personal experiences here would also be interesting.

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 Posted 9/30/2011 11:05:40 AM
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I was looking in the past at the HbA1c test but not reached a conclusion and did not research more. Thank you for having brought this back. Which is your reading and reference range if I can ask? I keep a moderate supplementation with carnosine, benfotiamine and R-ALA between others.

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 Posted 9/30/2011 5:29:56 PM
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Hi albedo, 

The LabCorp reference range is 4.8-5.6.  
My reading came back as 5.3, which seems a little high but in the range..
The report also indicates 5.7-6.4 is increased risk of diabetes, while > 6.4 is diabetes.

By the way I got more info on glucosepane... it sounds like there are some potential solutions for breaking this type of AGEs, stuff that's been tested in vitro but not in humans, so I doubt there's  supplements for it (or drugs).  I pasted some interesting links... note the last one came up in a google search and refers to the book LEF recently announced (The Future of Aging, edited by Gregory Fahy and Michael West).  Looking through the preview, now I see why it's over $200 -- 600 pages of detailed material.  I think I'll be purchasing that in my next order.
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 Posted 10/8/2011 1:47:52 AM
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Thank you sharing your lab results and the interesting links. Please keep researching and posting in this area.


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 Posted 10/16/2011 1:14:13 AM
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Do not miss the latest LEF article on AGE and HbA1c (by W Davis, MD):

http://www.lef.org/magazine/mag2011/oct2011_Wheat-The-Unhealthy-Whole-Grain_01.htm

" .... A slender person with a normal insulin response who consumes a limited amount of carbohydrates will have approximately 4.0 to 4.8 percent of all hemoglobin glycated (i.e., an HbA1c of 4.0 to 4.8 percent), reflecting the unavoidable low-grade, normal rate of glycation. Diabetics commonly have 8, 9, even 12 percent or more glycated hemoglobin—twice or more the normal rate. The majority of nondiabetic Americans are somewhere in between, most living in the range of 5.0 to 6.4 percent, above the perfect range but still below the “official” diabetes threshold of 6.5 percent.16,17 In fact, an incredible 70 percent of American adults have an HbA1c between 5.0 percent and 6.9 percent.18 HbA1c does not have to be 6.5 percent to generate adverse health consequences. HbA1c in the “normal” range is associated with increased risk for heart attacks, cancer, and 28 percent increased mortality for every 1 percent increase in HbA1c.19,20...."


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 Posted 10/16/2011 10:13:29 AM
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I am a slender guy with normal insulin response.
My HbA1c has been about 5.3 for the past two years, unchanging
even though I have been taking 3 MEOs/day over that period.
My yearly measured glucose levels have been between 95 and 110.
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 Posted 10/16/2011 10:26:00 AM
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Thank you Kench for sharing. I had a similar experience despite using MEO ingredients at similar dosages.
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 Posted 3/19/2012 4:16:09 PM
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The reason the MEO's don't appear to have made any difference is because supplements in general do not work.

They are just products devised to lure the living in hopers into parting with their money.

It's how capitalism functions.. a whole lot of people spending a whole lot of money on things they don't really need.

Brutal, and hard to swallow, I know.

Why they don't work is debatable.. be it poor assimilation or absorption, or perhaps just because genetics are more powerful and will always gain the upper hand over supplements.
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 Posted 5/8/2012 12:28:19 PM
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I'd like to get more info on MEO's to understand why they aren't lowering our glycation readings.   

While I largely disagree with the comment by pureist, I think it is important that we evaluate the products we take and try to determine if they are having a positive effect.  I've seen an enormous reduction in cholesterol, boost in hormone levels, and reduction in glucose following supplement use.  Numerous pharmaceuticals are based on or derived from supplements, so it's difficult to claim that supplements are wholly ineffective.  

Even with reputable suppliers, effectiveness probably varies a good deal, depending on numerous factors.  Supplements is a large category -- effectiveness will vary, and some will have a much more direct and measurable impact.  That's why blood tests are so important -- they let us measure and analyze the effects.  

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 Posted 5/8/2012 2:12:57 PM
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There are studies indicating antiglycation benefits in association with a number of compounds, including carnosine and benfotiamine, however their effectiveness in humans will vary.  One's intake of sugars, protein and AGEs will impact results.  There are likely unknown factors as well, at this point in human knowledge on the subject. 

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