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Cholesterol and Red Yeast Rice

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 Posted 4/12/2011 6:02:10 AM
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Life Extension's Product Development department provided the following response:

We have considered this. However, for various reasons, we decided it was best to only offer non-Life Extension label products at this time.
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 Posted 4/12/2011 8:38:33 PM
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So the reason is, "various reasons"?

LoL, Product Development 's responses may not always be informative, but they are often amusing!
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 Posted 1/23/2012 12:25:58 AM
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Yes, sometime I also find strange the replies we get...

I also would like to see LEF offering a LEF quality standard RYR product. A lot depends on the statins content and how you absorb it, I guess. For 4 months, I have been running on 600 mg/d RYR (from Nature's Plus, here) + 20 mg/d Policosanol + 1000 mg/d Guggulipid + increased niacin (flush, ~100-150 mg/d) without much results.

My LDL is still too high (but went down a little) as well as TC but HDL is excellent. So balance has improved but LDL not yet good. LP(a) is OK. Went through a full VAP profile and still checking.

Maybe the RYR dose is too low? Maybe I took it for too short? Seriously considering a pharma statin at least for a short period of time (with Q10, NAC and R-ALA to support liver).


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 Posted 1/23/2012 3:11:16 AM
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Al, Just for your info only: niacin will give you a warm feeling but that is it. The HDL-C increase that is associated with it  does not correlate with a decrease in morbidity or mortality. The M&M studies were done with Niaspan, a RX niacin product. Statins are the way to go.  GL
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 Posted 1/23/2012 4:44:51 AM
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Thank you for your reply Cooochie!

The decision I would need to make is: should I try and increase the RYR doses (one of my doctors suggested 2x900 mg RYR and see if the effect on LDL I think i see confirms) or, as in any case the RYR effect on LDL is due to the statin contents, i am better off with a low dose, pharma grade statin and closely monitor liver/kidney function and myalgia symptoms during treatment. You seems going for the latter. Once normalized I can keep a targeted nutritional/exercise/supplementation.

Note: I do not consider myself at particularly high CV risk, my calcium score is very low and kept so during the last 5-6 years. Actually should I worry about LDL at all? You also need to see at all the CV "daggers" LEF defined (i think there were 17 if I recollect well, homocysteine, firbrinogen, etc ....)
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 Posted 1/23/2012 6:43:47 AM
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I would look at your LDL-C/HDL-C (pre niacin) ratio. If that is 1.5 or lower that is great. Above 2 and take statins (they do more than reduce LDL-C). Remember to use pre-niacin HDL-C numbers.  If you can get low cost crestor or lipitor take it as a sup. unless your LDL-C is below 80 (which I am sure it is not). Just my 2 cents, but I think my infor is sound. BTW I am unfamiliar with RYR. AS far as side effects with statin: high dose statins cause far more problems than the lower dose and more potent statins; crestor and lipitor (crestor my fav). The absolute best thing for cholestorel though is a high salmon diet. I once was eating 6-8 lbs/wk and my LDL-C was 60 with a HDL-C of 75 (on no meds too).
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 Posted 1/27/2012 8:33:26 PM
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Tom. (4/6/2011)
The FDA sent out warnings that Red Yeast Rice can not contain the ingredient that lowers cholesterol because it's identical to the prescription drug.  Some companies sell it not claiming any cholesterol lowering benefits, or any other benefit for that matter, and have  been able to fly under the FDA radar even though it may contain some. Any reputable supplement company is going to abide by the FDA warning and not carry it.  For this reason there is no standardized product on the market so quality and purity are a concern.


Quality and purity are a concern because the qualities that make red yeast rice valuable for lowering cholesterol must be stripped from any product sold to the American market..

Making it "impure", we can suppose!

A reputable company would publicly call bull**** on the FDA, but a company interested in survival probably would not.
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 Posted 2/12/2012 8:51:04 AM
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It would be really nice to have LEF offering RYR at LEF quality standard. I am checking European products which are standardized to about 1.6% monacolins (or 2% monacolin K = lovastatin) as per labeling but content of the citrinin toxin is a concern. A well known study found this toxin in about 1/3 of tested product on the market. I am asking several sources for this testing.

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 Posted 2/13/2012 12:38:00 PM
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coochie (1/23/2012)
The absolute best thing for cholestorel though is a high salmon diet. I once was eating 6-8 lbs/wk and my LDL-C was 60 with a HDL-C of 75 (on no meds too).


That's interesting. 7 lbs/wk of fresh cooked salmon corresponds to 6.5 g/day of DHA and a third of that of EPA. (And if your diet was canned salmon, the DHA required would only be 2.3 g/day.) Might be worth trying a high level of DHA supplementation with a high protein/low carb diet.
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 Posted 11/29/2012 10:21:36 AM
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Red Yeast Rice is a Statin Drug

The "active" compoundsin red yeast rice are known as monacolins, and are substances known to inhibitcholesterol synthesis. One type of monacolin, "monacolin K," is alsoknown as mevinolin or lovastatin.[3]

Lovastatin, as you might now recognize, is the first statin drug to be approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and it goes by the brand names of Mevacor and Altocor. So ifyou’re taking red yeast rice in the hopes of avoiding a statin drug --surprise!

They’re essentially the same drug.

Statin drugs work by inhibiting an enzyme in your liver that’s needed to manufacture cholesterol. What is so concerning about this is that when you go tinkering around with the delicate workings of your body, you risk throwing everything off kilter.

For starters, statin drugs deplete your body of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), which is beneficial to heart health and muscle function.

CoQ10 is a cofactor (co-enzyme) that is essential for a system of enzymes that create ATP molecules, which are needed for cellular energy production.

Organs, such as your heart, which have higher energy requirements therefore also need more CoQ10 to function properly.

Statins deplete your body ofCoQ10, which can have devastating results. And because doctors rarely inform people of this risk and advise them to take a CoQ10 supplement, as your body gets more and more depleted, it can lead to fatigue, followed by muscle weakness and soreness, and eventually heart failure.

Statin drugs have also beenlinked to:

·        An increased risk of polyneuropathy (nerve damage that causes pain in the hands and feet and trouble walking)

·        Dizziness

·        Cognitive impairment, including memory loss[5]

·        A potential increased risk of cancer[6]

·        Decreased function of your immune system[7]

·        Depression

·        Liver problems, including a potential increase in liver enzymes (so people taking statins must be regularly monitored for normal liver function)

And a possible association was even found between statins and an increased risk of Lou Gehrig's disease.[8]

Your body needs cholesterol and high cholesterol does not cause heart disease.  Arteriosclerosis is caused by multiple nutritional deficiencies.  These deficiencies prevent the arteries fromrepairing the inevitable damage caused by mechanical and oxidative stress.  The body responds by laying down plaque in order to prevent the arteries from leaking. This process can be reversed by correcting the cause of the problem: the nutritional deficiencies.  You must replace each of the missing nutrients and do so with therapeutic doses of each nutrient.  Once you have resupplemented the required nutrients, your body will rebuild the arteries to their normal strong and flexible state.  Since the plaque is no longer needed to prevent your arteries from leaking, your body uses natural processes to remove the plaque.

 

Ray Ellis

SaveYourHeart.com

 

[3]MayoClinic.com "Red Yeast Rice (Monascus Purpureus)" (AccessedJuly 2, 2009)

[4] TheJournal of Clinical Investigation December 2007; 117(12):3940-51

[5]Mercola.com Sudden Memory Loss Linked to Cholesterol Drugs (AccessedJuly 2, 2009)

[6] NatureMedicine September, 2000;6:965-966, 1004-1010.

[7] NatureMedicine, December, 2000; 6: 1311-1312, 1399-1402

[8]Edwards, I. Ralph; Star, Kristina; Kiuru, Anne, "Statins, NeuromuscularDegenerative Disease and an Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis-Like Syndrome," Drug Safety, Volume 30, Number 6, 2007, pp. 515-525(11)

 



Ray Ellis


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