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 Posted 2/23/2011 6:41:26 PM
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A search shows that the last article published by LEF recommending Deprenyl for life extension and neuro- protection is 15 years old. Has there been any change to this recommendation? Is 10mg per week still the suggested dose?
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 Posted 2/24/2011 7:25:27 AM
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Proponents of (-)-deprenyl believe the drug offers potential for a reduction in the rate of erosion of cognitive function, as well as reduction or even prevention of age-related neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's through the daily administration of approximately 1 to 1.5 mg (-)-deprenyl, or a total weekly dose of approximately 10 mg.


A 1996 article (September) from our magazine indicates that “The Foundation now recommends a lower dose of deprenyl for Parkinson's patients and for antiaging purposes based upon the evidence presented in this article. We recommend that healthy, aging persons take no more than 10 mg of deprenyl per week, and that untreated, early-stage Parkinson's patients take the lowest dose of deprenyl that produces symptomatic relief (1.5 mg-to-l0 mg a day), with the dose of deprenyl reduced or eliminated as the patient moves into the latter stages of the disease.”

http://www.lef.org/magazine/mag96/sept96_versy6.htm

 

Life Extension's department of scientific affairs had this to say on the subject:

 
Despite documented efficacy in the treatment of Parkinson's disease sufferers, (-)-deprenyl for Alzheimer's disease has proved disappointing.


A Cochrane meta-analysis published in 2003 involving 17 Alzheimer’s disease studies utilizing (-)-deprenyl as an active intervention showed little evidence of major tolerability problems (i.e. adverse events), yet little evidence of a clinically meaningful benefit for Alzheimer's disease sufferers was generated {Reference: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2003;(1):CD000442.}


Proponents of (-)-deprenyl maintain that the drug may slow age-related decay of behavioral performance, prolong life, and prevent or delay the onset of age-related neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's via the prophylactic administration of low doses.


Nevertheless, rigorous human clinical data with placebo control of the capacity for (-)-deprenyl to prevent or delay the onset of age-related neurodegenerative disease is still unavailable.


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 Posted 2/26/2011 8:19:03 AM
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Reportedly (Claude Dalle, 2007) a study published in the American Geriatrics Society concludes that every person in good health should consider 10-15 mg per week as prevention starting from 45 years to improve quality of life in last decades of life, increase life expectancy and slow progression of Alzheimer and Parkinson. Deprenyl should never be taken with anti depression drugs.
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