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Natural remedies for radiation burns?

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 Posted 2/3/2011 7:13:11 PM
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Hi all,

My mom received radiation therapy to treat stage 3 breast cancer. She just finished up her treatment, and now has 3rd-degree burns to the skin on her collarbone. They gave her a prescription cream to apply to the area (I need to find out what the prescription was), but does anyone know of any natural treatments that might aid in healing and possibly pain relief?

Thanks so much in advance for any help.

Stephanie


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 Posted 2/4/2011 4:17:16 AM
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Aloe vera gel is a traditional remedy for burns but might be better to use once the prescription drug has run out. 
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 Posted 2/15/2011 9:08:06 AM
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Great info--thanks to DDye and syntax for your replies!
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 Posted 3/8/2011 12:02:08 AM
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I've understood both coconut oil and sesame oil to be good for skin regeneration, skin protection; we are using it during my wife's current rounds of radiation therapy. Actually we just started rubbing it in today. Today was her 15th of 30 visits and the skin color is starting to turn. Where she has been beginning to complain of irritation, tenderness and swelling begins to show - these two oils seem to be giving some comfort. Time will tell. Comments about this welcome please.

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 Posted 3/8/2011 5:27:46 PM
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LEF has an article on Radiation Therapy here:

http://www.lef.org/protocols/cancer/radiation_therapy_01.htm

Hypersensitivity reactions: skin/fibrosis. Acute radiation dermatitis (inflammation of the skin) is a common side effect of radiotherapy. Dermatitis includes redness (erythema) and dry or moist peeling skin (desquamation). It has been estimated that 87 percent of all women undergoing radiation therapy for breast cancer will develop some degree of radiation dermatitis (Fisher J et al. 2000). Severe radiation dermatitis can be painful, may lead to infections, and can cause permanent scarring.

No standard treatment has been recommended for the prevention of radiation-induced dermatitis, though several therapies have been suggested (Westbury C et al. 2000; Wickline MM 2004). Several dressing types used to treat radiation dermatitis can provide a moist healing environment that is optimal for cell migration across the wound, thereby shortening healing time (Margolin SG et al. 1990).

Topical agents such as corticosteroid creams and other products, including aloe vera gel or trolamine (Biafine®), are commonly prescribed at the onset of radiation dermatitis or at the beginning of radiotherapy (Bostrom A et al. 2001; Schmuth M et al. 2002). Biafine® is a water-based emulsion that has been used in France since 1973 to alleviate symptoms of radiation dermatitis (Fenig E et al. 2001; Fisher J et al. 2000).

Calendula, derived from the marigold flower, has purported anti-inflammatory properties and is often used for wound healing. A recent trial found that calendula was significantly better than Biafine® in preventing mild-to-severe acute radiation dermatitis in breast cancer patients, as well as in providing pain relief (Pommier P et al. 2004). Patients applied the preparation to the irradiated skin at least twice a day at the onset of radiation therapy and continued this until completion of treatment.

In clinical trials, the application of aloe vera gel was no better than placebo or aqueous cream in reducing radiation-induced dermatitis (Heggie S et al. 2002; Williams MS et al. 1996). However, aloe vera gel added to soap has a protective effect for patients who received higher cumulative radiation doses, prolonging the time to detectable skin damage from three to five weeks (Olsen DL et al. 2001).

Dexpanthenol (vitamin B5) creams have been shown to improve acute radiotherapy skin reactions in some (Roper B et al. 2004) but not all studies (Lokkevik E et al. 1996).

N-acetylcysteine is capable of stimulating radio-protective cytokines (Baier JE et al. 1996). The application of gauze soaked in 10 percent N-acetylcysteine for 15 minutes before radiation therapy was associated with more rapid healing of skin reactions and less use of pain relievers compared to an untreated control group (Kim JA et al. 1983).

Unsaturated essential fatty acids (EFAs) are necessary for the production of prostaglandins (PGEs) (inflammatory modulators) and play an important role in maintaining cell membrane structure by regulating membrane fluidity (Horrobin DF 1992). The ability of EFAs containing both gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) to modify radiation-induced skin reactions was studied in pigs (Hopewell JW et al. 1994). Oral administration of 3 ml of oil daily for four weeks before and up to 16 weeks after irradiation significantly reduced both acute and late radiation skin damage. Prospective studies suggest that prostaglandins have great potential in minimizing the adverse effects of radiotherapy on normal tissue. The potential use of misoprostol, a PGE(1) analogue, before irradiation may be considered in the prevention of radiation-induced side effects (Lee TK et al. 2002).
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 Posted 10/3/2011 5:52:33 AM
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spfeiffer0502 (2/4/2011)
Hi all,

My mom received radiation therapy to treat stage 3 breast cancer. She just finished up her treatment, and now has 3rd-degree burns to the skin on her collarbone. They gave her a prescription cream to apply to the area (I need to find out what the prescription was), but does anyone know of any natural treatments that might aid in healing and possibly pain relief?

Thanks so much in advance for any help.

Stephanie


Well, I don`t know why, but everyone out there seems to either be unaware of or chooses not to acknowledge the extensive research Dr. Denham Harman and many others have done regarding just this issue. Dr. Harman was hired by the US Government back in the 1950s to find ways to minimize the harmful effects of radiation exposure resulting from ATOM BOMBS. This man produced some meaningful results. He fulfilled the mission assigned him. He is the father of: Free Radical Scavengers and Reactive Oxygen Species scavengers as: a remedy for radiation exposure.
   His theories and the remedy for radiation exposure are historical fact. The many mice studies done by him and others have proven that the compound known as BHT [ butylated hydroxytoluene ] is very effective in coping with the harmful effects of radiation in all of it`s forms or types.
   And in 2008 it was proven that BHT occurs naturally in at least some phytoplankton. Organisms that are exposed to high levels of UV radiation interestingly enough when you think about it. The connection is obvious. BHT protects said phytoplankton from the harmful effects of UV radiation.
   The radiation for cancer treatment is different, but the result is the same. The cleavage and destruction of organic [ carbon based ] structures.
   Here is an extensive article published in the journal: PHYSIOLOGICAL REVIEWS that discusses all this: http://physrev.physiology.org/content/87/4/1175/T3.expansion.html
    That table rates the different antioxidants as average lifespan extenders and here is the full text version that table is a tiny portion of:    http://physrev.physiology.org/content/87/4/1175.full
    It is worth mentioning that Dr. Harman achieved an average lifespan increase in his mice tests of up to 45% to 50% in BHT dosed mice because: As his critics pointed out, the mice he was using had a relatively short lifespan due to their propensity for getting CANCER. His critics stated that ALL he was doing was preventing these mice from getting cancer and that accounted for their average lifespan increase. If that is true then people with cancer MIGHT be interested in BHT.

   Also, the mice used in the tests refferenced in that PHYSIOLOGICAL REVIEWS article were not bred for short lifespans and average lifespan increases for those mice were between 22% and 31%. As far as I am concerned: BHT has proven itself over and over again so many times now that it is a mystery to me why so few people are aware of all of this research. Oh, it costs so very little [ 12 to 15 dollars for 100 dosages ]. Maybe that has something to do with it, I don`t know. Also it is a food preservative. Many people find that a source of amusement for some reason. Yes, BHT is an excellent food preservative, and hey, guess what, it preserves living people also.   ...Oscar


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