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All Dairy Milk Now Adding 10% USDA Active Vitamin A, Causing Bone...

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 Posted 7/1/2014 10:35:54 AM
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Tom, you are correct. The fat in dairy is what contains the fat soluble nutrients such as vitamin A. 
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 Posted 7/1/2014 5:22:28 PM
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Some yogurt isn't fortified with vitamin A either.  For example:

Fage Greek yogurt 0% fat:  Pasteurized Skimmed Milk, Live Active Yogurt Cultures (L. Bulgaricus, S. Thermophilus, L. Acidophilus, Bifidus, L. Casei).

So to the OP ... eat yogurt if you want calcium from dairy sans added vitamin A.  Yogurt, especially Greek yogurt, offers more health benefits than plain milk.

-Tom 

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The case against dietary fats >>  CLICK HERE
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 Posted 7/2/2014 11:36:57 PM
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Hi Chutzpa,

regarding Retinol Acid (Active Vitamin vs Beta-Carotine), perhaps you are interestes in this article for balancing your view:

http://www.supernutritionusa.com/images/pdfs/VitaminALongVersion.pdf

About 50% of healthy people cannot convert Beta-Carotine  to Retinol Acid so all of their Vitamin A needs must come from Retinol Acid. S

Regarding bones and Vit A there's a study mentioned (at the link above) that has used blood test instead of the older studies with querstionaries only.


Barker, ME, et al. Serum retinoids and beta-carotene as predictors of hip and other fractures in elderly women. J Bone Miner Res. 2005 Jun;20(6):913-20.

Comment:
This newer study looked at this issue more critically using blood measurement of vitamin A. Blood tests yield much more credible conclusions than what can be determined by questionnaire-based studies. This study found no increased bone loss with higher vitamin A  blood levels. In fact, the authors said, “Risk of [bone] fracture was slightly less in the [highest blood vitamin A group] compared with the lowest.” They also said, “There was a tend of increased [blood vitamin A] to predict benefit rather than harm in terms of bone mineral density. Multivitamin or cod liver oil was associated with significantly lower risk of any fracture. 73 Ask your doctor to measure the vitamin A in blood tests to see if you have too much or too little vitamin A. Optimal blood levels of vitamin A can be a valuable part of long-term bone health.


Having enough vitamin D in the blood will balance larger intakes of Retinol Acid and prevent toxicity.


It was found that all synthetic vitamin D-analogs tested (MC903, KH1060, EB1089, and EB1213) reduced the amount of cell-associated [3H]retinoid activity by 35-50% as compared to the vehicle. More specifically, the appearance of the parent substrate and two of its main metabolites, e.g., 3,4-didehydroretinol (ddROH) and 3,4-didehydroretinoic acid (ddRA), was inhibited by the synthetic vitamin D-analogs. The effects on retinol metabolism were not potentiated by coincubation of cells with vitamin D-analogs plus retinoic acid (RA) or 9-cis-RA. This study demonstrates that synthetic vitamin D3 interferes with both the uptake and the metabolism of retinol by human epidermal keratinocytes.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9627692

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 Posted 7/17/2014 12:15:00 PM
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Hi Chutzpah, A very many peoples are prone to " lactose intolerance ". Said peoples should avoid dairy products, especially milk. Here is what " John Hopkins Institute " has to say about all this:

     http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/healthlibrary/conditions/digestive_disorders/lactose_intolerance_85,P00388/

John Hopkins does have a pretty well established reputation for providing reliable information on health issues.   ...Oscar  


Will read, thanks. 
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 Posted 7/17/2014 12:16:35 PM
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Tom. (6/30/2014)
If I remember correctly fat free yogurt doesn't contain vitamin A.  It's good with berries and raw honey. Greek variety has 24 grams of protein per seving.

-Tom


Will look into yogurt, thanks.
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 Posted 7/17/2014 12:19:48 PM
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Sorrento (7/3/2014)
Hi Chutzpa,

regarding Retinol Acid (Active Vitamin vs Beta-Carotine), perhaps you are interestes in this article for balancing your view:

http://www.supernutritionusa.com/images/pdfs/VitaminALongVersion.pdf



Will research, thanks. I think it's important to see where the body of evidence stands regarding the issue. 
Post #13333
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