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Ceramides for skin; are you kidding me?

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 Posted 2/1/2011 10:52:46 AM
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I was a little suspect about the claims for this product. But I tried it for a month and I find it is effective for moisturizing skin from the inside out. This is my first day in years of not slathering my whole body with moisturizers. January is the acid test, and this works. I'm so grateful for this amazing relief. Thank you LEF.

~Dennis
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 Posted 2/1/2011 2:31:51 PM
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Welcome, Dennis.  Glad to hear the product helped you!  (Hmmm . . . i need to get some now.)

D Dye
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 Posted 2/2/2011 6:13:15 AM
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I'm taking this for the cholesterol claims, but I am now worried that ceramides might do the opposite of what I want. This from an abstract:

The ceramide concentration showed a significant positive correlation with total cholesterol (TC) and triglycerides (TG). In addition, plasma ceramide level increased drastically at a high level of LDL cholesterol (more than 170 mg/dL). Our previous studies demonstrated that the sum of fragmented and conjugated apolipoprotein B-100 proteins (B-ox), which were products of a radical reaction of LDL as well as plasma, was a reliable index of atherosclerosis. B-ox showed a significant positive correlation with the plasma ceramide level. Based on these results, we propose that the ceramide level in human plasma is a risk factor at the early stages of atherosclerosis.

Here's the source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17152923

So cholesterol increases ceramide, but does ceramide increase cholesterol?


BTW, ceramide definitely has a positive effect on the skin. Even after just one day.
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 Posted 2/2/2011 7:52:26 AM
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Life Extension's Advisory department provided the following:

Plant-based sphingolipids, like those found in Skin Restoring Ceramides with Lipowheat™, are distinct from those occurring in animals and dietary supplementation with these plant-based sphingolipids is a safe and effective way to support healthy skin and glucose metabolism.

An important point to consider when reviewing data related to ceramides and sphingolipids is that there are important differences in chemical structure and bioactivity between endogenously produced mammalian sphingolipids compared to plant-based sphingolipids. 

The structural foundation of sphingolipids is an N-acylated fatty acid generally containing 14 – 26 carbon atoms (some rare exceptions in humans contain up to 34 carbon atoms), which is referred to as the long chain base (LCB). In mammals, most endogenous sphingolipids contain a LCB that consists of (E)-sphing-4-enine (d18:14). In plants, however, a much more dynamic array of LCB’s are incorporated into sphingolipds – up to eight different C18-sphingoid bases derived from D-erythro-sphinganine, common among which is phytosphingosine (t18:0). Significantly, the d18:14 LCB, which is the primary LCB in mammals, is virtually absent in plants.1

Importantly, the most common sphingolipids in humans – sphingomyelin, galactosyl ceramides, and neuraminic acid gangliosides – are not present in plants.

With these facts in mind, consider that in a double-blind, randomized, placebo controlled (P) clinical study of 12 men with metabolic syndrome aged 51 ± 2 years supplementation with 1,000 mg of phytosphingosine (PS) (PS is a component in Skin Restoring Ceramides with Lipowheat™) daily for four weeks was shown to reduce serum cholesterol (5.1±0.3 (PS) vs 5.4±0.3 (P) mmol/l; P<0.05), LDL-cholesterol (3.1±0.3 (PS) vs 3.4±0.3 (P) mmol/l; P<0.05), and fasting glucose levels (6.2±0.3 (PS) vs 6.5±0.3 (P) mmol/l; P<
0.05).2

This human clinical trial is supported by animal data which has also documented beneficial effects of dietary plant-based sphingolipids on lipid metabolism.3

Although this topic is complex, in retrospect the article in the February 2011 issue of Life Extension Magazine
did not provide an appropriate explanation of the technical differences between plant-based sphingolipids and ceramides vs.
endogenous animal sphingolipids and ceramides. We also recognize that the article contained several statements that, again in retrospect, clearly required a more balanced presentation of data, and we apologize for this omission.  

1. Biochim Biophys Acta. 2003 Jun 10;1632(1-3):1-15.
2.
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2010 Apr;64(4):419-23.
3.  Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Aug;84(2):312-21.

 

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 Posted 2/2/2011 11:41:16 AM
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Thanks, DDye. So taking three capsules daily might reduce LDL by 10% or so, while taking just one as I've been doing will probably not be therapeutic.
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 Posted 2/2/2011 11:46:02 AM
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If you're referring to the trial of 12 men in which some received 1000 mg phytosphingosine, it would be difficult to draw that conclusion. 
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 Posted 2/2/2011 12:19:10 PM
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DDye (2/2/2011)
If you're referring to the trial of 12 men in which some received 1000 mg phytosphingosine, it would be difficult to draw that conclusion. 


Why?
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 Posted 2/2/2011 12:27:45 PM
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The trial was very small and the compound tested was phytosphingosine.  There is not enough evidence for me to conclude that a certain dosage of Skin Restoring Ceramides with Lipowheat could reduce one's LDL by a given amount. 
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 Posted 4/24/2011 1:27:03 PM
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I have already contacted LEF regarding this product which I feel is questionable for prolonged oral use. My complaint is based on numerous studies that can be brought up by just googling Ceramides and indicate that correlate with insulin problems.  I do apply ceramides topically.
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 Posted 4/24/2011 3:12:44 PM
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is this the study on ceramides and insulin resistance your talking about?
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10419100
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