Life Extension Forums




How long does it usually take for hypertension or hyperglycemia to...

Author Message
 Posted 2/18/2014 10:57:56 AM
Spectator

SpectatorSpectatorSpectatorSpectatorSpectatorSpectatorSpectatorSpectatorSpectator

Status: Regular Customer
Group: Forum Members
Last Login: 10/19/2014 3:16:18 PM
Posts: 5, Visits: 117
Hi everyone,

My sister's blood pressure has been between 135/85 to 140/95 consistently starting about 2 years ago, however, after recent lifestyle modifications her blood pressure is now around 115/65 to 120/70. Are there any studies that indicate that kidney damage (lowered GFR) or arterial/capillary damage could have occurred during that time? Her other signs were fine, no tachycardia, hyperglycemia, or other factors in her blood tests that could cause kidney/artery damage to occur.

I also have other family members who haven't controlled their diabetes (fasting glucose at 125) but have normal blood pressure / other factors, is there a general timeline that's been established for when and at what rate this starts to cause permanent damage to kidneys/arteries?

Thanks!
Post #11939
Add to Twitter Add to Facebook
 Posted 2/18/2014 11:20:47 AM
Forum Coordinator

Forum Coordinator

Status: LE Employee
Group: Managers
Last Login: 6 hours ago
Posts: 1,937, Visits: 7,237
Has she had kidney function tests?

Tags:
Post #11941
Add to Twitter Add to Facebook
 Posted 2/18/2014 1:54:21 PM
Spectator

SpectatorSpectatorSpectatorSpectatorSpectatorSpectatorSpectatorSpectatorSpectator

Status: Regular Customer
Group: Forum Members
Last Login: 10/19/2014 3:16:18 PM
Posts: 5, Visits: 117
DDye (2/18/2014)
Has she had kidney function tests?


Only recently she has, and they indicated normal kidney function blood markers and a normal GFR, so I have no way of knowing whether this short term hypertension could've impacted these markers even slightly. Was curious if there was a general rule of thumb for when damage starts, and the rate at which this damage occurs and alters kidney / circulatory health.
Post #11943
Add to Twitter Add to Facebook
 Posted 2/18/2014 3:55:00 PM
Forum Coordinator

Forum Coordinator

Status: LE Employee
Group: Managers
Last Login: 6 hours ago
Posts: 1,937, Visits: 7,237
Life Extension's information on high blood pressure http://www.lef.org/protocols/heart_circulatory/high_blood_pressure_01.htm and kidney health http://www.lef.org/protocols/kidney_urinary/kidney_health_01.htm#introduction have some limited information on the relationship between hypertension and kidney damage (copied below) but there's nothing as specific as you are looking for.  She would be advised to consult a physician. In addition to blood tests, there are highly sensitive urinary markers of kidney disease.

How old is she? Although there is significant disagreement on this matter, some physicians believe that older adults whose blood pressure is in the range you mention shouldn't be treated for hypertension. Not to make light of it--just want you to know that among older people, having blood pressure in that range is not considered damaging by some (but not all) authorities.

"Aside from the influence of neural triggers on heart rate, much of blood pressure control is performed by the kidneys. By controlling the balance of water and salt, the kidneys influence blood volume, lending long-term blood pressure control. The kidneys also produce hormones that act remotely to increase blood pressure through vasoconstriction of arteries. Kidney function can become impaired as people age, which is another reason why blood pressure may increase as we grow older. A major reason for kidney impairment is hypertension, so those starting with mild kidney problems have elevated blood pressure that then inflicts more kidney damage resulting in still higher blood pressure readings."
http://www.lef.org/protocols/heart_circulatory/high_blood_pressure_01.htm

"High blood pressure (or hypertension) creates a significant risk factor for kidney failure. This risk factor is amplified for persons with ADPKD. After investigaing the 24-hour blood pressure profile of ambulatory patients, particularly to measure nocturnal fall of blood pressure, researchers found that in ADPKD patients, the reduction in nocturnal blood pressure was attenuated (lessened), indicating increased risk for kidney damage (Li Kam Wa 1997). Further studies are needed to evaluate the contribution of nocturnal hypertension on the overall progression of renal failure. However, in another related study of untreated children, it was found that nocturnal hypertension was a major risk factor for renal deterioration (Lingens 1997)."
http://www.lef.org/protocols/kidney_urinary/kidney_health_01.htm#introduction


Tags:
Post #11944
Add to Twitter Add to Facebook


Similar Topics

Expand / Collapse

Reading This Topic

Expand / Collapse