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Vitamin K2 against soft tissue calcification generated by vitamin D

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 Posted 1/16/2011 3:46:56 AM
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I was on 4000 IU daily of vitamin D3 for 5 months in 2009-2010. From 2nd month I developed a strange chest pain sometimes in the day. Now, 8 months after discontinuing vitamin D this pain persists sometimes in the day. (I go on Zone Diet, am 28, and do 1 hour of daily exercise 5 times per week)

Last year I had done an EKG/ECG and it was perfect.

Since I mantain my idea of vitamin D3 overdose as cause, after reviewing much medical literature I believe vitamin D3 caused me some soft tissue calcification.

So, before going to my cardiologist I will give a try to a 1xday LEF Super K Advanced K2 Complex for 6-8 weeks.

In animals K2 can reverse arterial calcification in 6 weeks.

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 Posted 1/16/2011 10:40:58 AM
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I've added natto to my diet every day. It has 400-500micrograms MK7 in it on average(at 50 gm servings). This is about 4 to 5 times as much in the Booster or Super K Advanced K2 Complex. It has little of K1 or the MK4 form of vitamin K though.

It takes about 3 weeks to peak out on MK7 levels. The MK4 and K1 don't seem to be cumulative as they don't last in the body long so there's nothing to build up on, the MK7 lasts for days with gradual decreasing levels if stopped but higher than baseline for days.

I was concerned because I was taking 6-8000 IU of D a day with coconut oil to increase absorption.

Vitamin K has a lot of very good benefits besides directing calcium into the bones.

One study found that inadequate calcium also contributes to calcium formation in tissue/arteries strangely enough, so decreasing calcium intake won't resolve the problem.


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 Posted 1/16/2011 3:35:02 PM
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How do you know the pain is caused by vitamin D?  Have you had the calcification verified?

You mentioned that you exercise 5 times per week.  Perhaps the pain is muscular.  A lot of chest pain is caused by muscle strain.  Also, an electrocardiogram is not the last word on heart problems. 
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 Posted 1/17/2011 5:06:07 AM
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DDye (1/16/2011)
How do you know the pain is caused by vitamin D?  Have you had the calcification verified?

You mentioned that you exercise 5 times per week.  Perhaps the pain is muscular.  A lot of chest pain is caused by muscle strain.  Also, an electrocardiogram is not the last word on heart problems. 


I said its a supposition. I never have chest pain when I do exercise or even heavy exercise. Also, I do exercise many years ago. I tried to rest last August with almost no exercise, and nothing changed.

Also, when chest pain began 15 months ago I wasnt going to gym, only a mild exercise practising Pilates twice a week. So definitely exercise as cause has no sense. Thanks anyway!

Only one thing I changed when I developed chest pain was high vitamin D supplementation. Also I added in that time organic butter everyday, but I stopped to eat this, nothing changed. The most incredible thing is that I thought I was deep vitamin D deficient so I increased my vitamin D and only I felt even worse!

After reading that many people are sensitive to vitamin D doses higuer than 2000-3000 IU daily, I suspected of it. And of course now its only a supposition.

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 Posted 1/17/2011 5:30:20 AM
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In answer to your request for suggestions or ideas, it would be good to get a definitive diagnosis.  Maybe an x-ray or ultrasound could confirm the calcification you suspect. 

I do know of people who had long term pain in their chest area from muscle injury or strain.  It may not necessarily be from exercise, but could be caused by lifting or pushing heavy objects, etc.  The pain can vary and spasms can also occur intermittently. 
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 Posted 1/17/2011 9:47:44 AM
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Tissue calcinosis is a patholigical process where calcium is deposited into soft tissue. Many people believe that this can be caused by taking too much calcium and/or vitamin D. We believe that this is not true. First off, vitamin D "overdose" is not defined by dose, rather it is defined by changes in serum calcium levels. A simple blood test can rule out vitamin D as the culprit. Secondly, it is vitamin D and K2 deficiencies and inadequate consumption of calcium that causes the body to leach calcium from the bones to maintain normal blood levels. This "leaching" process from the bones is what causes calcinosis. Given your age and activity level, I would suggest speaking with your doctor about musculoskeletal causes of your pain. Hope this helps.

Michael A. Smith, MD
Clinical Information Specialist
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 Posted 1/17/2011 11:57:01 AM
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Dr Smith. Thanks a lot for your answer. I promise going to my cardiologist if my chest pain (only when resting) persists in some weeks. Regards from a proud LEF seller -and consumer, of course-.
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 Posted 2/7/2011 2:50:02 PM
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Wow, this is quite serious and exactly why mainstream medicine has hesitated to increase levels for D3 supplementation.

I was prescribed large amounts of D3 years ago and simply couldn't tolerate it due to it becoming a trigger for tinnitus and the supplements making me feel ill. One theory for this mysterious affliction is that the tiny receptor cells in the cochlea become calcified. I added K1 and K2 to my regimen and can say I feel much healthier for it.

I have noticed very wide differences in K2 levels in supplements and have taken this as a measure of the lack of agreement over what is a healthy amount. So I've been pretty careful taking too much. Also, dark greens have so much K in them and are otherwise so healthy for you that this is possibly the best way to add K to the diet (spinach, kale, chard and that southern specialty collard greens which is favored notably by American blacks who have serious problems with D3 deficiency due to skin color).  The George Mateljan Foundation is a great source for finding out where to get specific nutrients, but here's a Livestrong link on food sources for K that for some reason comes up in my Google search:

http://www.livestrong.com/article/279845-list-of-food-with-vitamin-k/

If, however, you want to take very large amounts of K, there are a couple vendors who offer large amounts of 5mg, and you might also investigate a liquid formulation that is offered as well (probably oil-based).


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 Posted 2/8/2011 3:55:43 PM
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I have the same thing when taking vitamin D, tinnitus starting about 2-3 hours after taking vitamin D.

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 Posted 2/8/2011 8:55:28 PM
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Spain,

I'm not a doctor but It seems highly unlikely that your chest pain was the result of calcification from vitamin D3 intake in just two, very short months. In fact, a severe deficiency in vitamin D over just a few years can cause chest pain due to hypovitaminosis D, resulting in osteopenia and osteomalacia. High levels in the 20,000 range per week in some severe cases have been used with great success to restore the body back to normal.

A cause for the chest pain could be nothing more than heart burn or GERD from megadoses of the Vitamin D3.  Heartburn can feel like a heart attack. Although you said the pain persists after stopping the Vitamin D3.

If I had to take a wild guess I'd say it's pleurisy.  I remember you mentioning way back when in the old form that you had helicobacter pylori infection. Pleurisy is caused by viral or bacterial inflammation of the thin tissues (pleura) that cover the lungs and chest wall.  In between these two pleura is a space called the pleural cavity. When the pleura gets inflamed the layers rub together causing  pleuritic pain, a very severe chest pain.

Talk to your doctor about these things. I just doubt it is the D3.


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