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Niacin - benefits for longevity?

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 Posted 10/19/2013 8:39:13 AM
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"Niacin, the fountain of youth"

"The vitamin niacin has a life-prolonging effect, as Michael Ristow has demonstrated in roundworms. From his study, the ETH-Zurich professor also concludes that so-called reactive oxygen species are healthy, not only disagreeing with the general consensus, but also many of his peers."

http://www.ethlife.ethz.ch/archive_articles/130930_niacin_fb/index_EN

Our good friend for its cholesterol lowering effects seems to have other befits. Interesting the point of not abusing with antioxidants too!

See also this:

http://www.nature.com/nchembio/journal/v9/n11/full/nchembio.1352.html




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 Posted 10/28/2013 3:14:24 PM
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Albedo, that's one weird article.  The researcher doesn't like anti-oxidants, but he does like niacin, which he says is an "exercise mimetic."  I take lots of anti-oxidants and niacin.  The proof for the longevity effect of anti-oxidants is given in numerous scientific papers.
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 Posted 11/2/2013 1:38:43 AM
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Yes Trans that is tricky. I do the same as you but the all "antioxidants" area looks complex and opinions are diverging. Even Aubrey de Grey mentions the issue of attacking the problem where it matters most (mitochondria) and the failure of general "souped-up" approaches (I recollected this from his book "Ending Age", i really recommend, and I could find one page (38/39) extract HERE). He even mentions the necessity of free-radicals.

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 Posted 11/3/2013 3:32:42 AM
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I do take 20 mg/day of LEF's PQQ for the mitochondria.  This, however, has caused a weight gain of 10 lbs.  On the other hand, the weight gain seems mostly to be muscle--I can do far more presses and curls than I could before.
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 Posted 11/3/2013 4:44:18 AM
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That is great Trans if you get it in the muscles. Since when are you taking it? I did try PQQ for a couple of months but could not feel a benefit (which does not meant it did no have it).

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 Posted 11/3/2013 6:33:47 AM
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Despite that the co-author of that paper is a friend of mine and I'm really proud of him and his colleagues having brought forth that publication, I have to say that I am quite sceptical concerning Ristow's interpretation of the study. Although he is undoubtedly a highly accomplished scientist, in my opinion he has shown a tendency to come up with bold conclusions. His thesis are often thought-provoking and I think he enjoys stirring some controversy and getting media attention. They should be taken with a grain of salt therefore (or several of them). Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) is an important mitochondrial coenzyme and is required by class III histone deacetlyases - the well-known sirtuins. Therefore, what appears as a life extending effect of methylnicotinamide-induced ROS may in fact be part of a redox-dependend feedback mechanism, involving activation of sirtuins other than SIRT1 (in this case sir-2.1) - or maybe completely different pathways not yet understood. But that's just my two cents. To be honest, the idea that a waste-product of the sirtuin activity rather than its complex epigenenetic actions should be the sole cause of its lifespan-extending effect seems quite strange to me.

Moreover, one should keep in mind that this is a study with nematodes. Sirtuins may act quite differently in mammals. It will be interesting to see if these observations can be reproduced in rodents.
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 Posted 11/3/2013 3:09:13 PM
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Albedo:  I started taking 10 mg/day of PQQ when LEF first came out with it, and then upped the dose to 20 mg/day about a year ago or so.  I didn't gain any weight with the 10 mg/day dosage, and it didn't seem to be doing much of anything.  So I switched to 20 mg/day and I noticed the effect on my muscles (and weight) within a couple of weeks.  
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 Posted 12/7/2013 1:23:51 PM
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A new recent study:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24311750?dopt=AbstractPlus

Vascular Endothelial Function and Oxidative Stress are Related to Dietary Niacin Intake Among Healthy Middle-Aged and Older Adults.

Abstract
We tested the hypothesis that vascular endothelial function and oxidative stress are related to dietary niacin intake among healthy middle-aged and older adults. In 127 men and women aged 48-77 years, brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) was positively related to dietary niacin intake (%Δ: r=0.20, P<0.05; mmΔ: r=0.25, P<0.01). In subjects with above-average dietary niacin intake (≥22mg/day, NHANES III), FMD was 25% greater than in subjects with below-average intake (P<0.05). Stepwise linear regression revealed that dietary niacin intake (above- vs. below-average) was an independent predictor of FMD (%Δ: β=1.8; mmΔ: β=0.05, both P<0.05). Plasma oxidized low-density lipoprotein, a marker of systemic oxidative stress, was inversely related to niacin intake (r=-0.23, P<0.05) and was lower in subjects with above- vs. below-average niacin intake (48±2 vs. 57±2 mg/dL, P<0.01). Intravenous infusion of the antioxidant vitamin C improved brachial FMD in subjects with below-average niacin intake (P<0.001, n=33), but not above-average (P>0.05, n=20). In endothelial cells sampled from the brachial artery of a subgroup, dietary niacin intake was inversely related to nitrotyrosine, a marker of peroxynitrite-mediated oxidative damage (r=-0.30, P<0.05, n=55), and expression of the pro-oxidant enzyme, NADPH oxidase (r=-0.44, p<0.01, n=37), and these markers were lower in subjects with above- vs. below-average niacin intake (nitrotyrosine: 0.39±0.05 vs. 0.56±0.07; NADPH oxidase: 0.38±0.05 vs. 0.53±0.05 [ratio to HUVEC control], both P<0.05). Our findings support the hypothesis that higher dietary niacin intake is associated with greater vascular endothelial function related to lower systemic and vascular oxidative stress among healthy middle-aged and older adults.
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 Posted 12/8/2013 3:38:27 AM
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Thanks, Albedo.  I recently decided to reduce PQQ from 20 mg back to 10 mg; I will see if I lose the 10 lbs I gained using the 20 mg.  As for niacin, I'm now taking an additional 500 mg at bedtime, as recommended by my orthomolecular doctor.   He wants me to take 3000 mg/day, but I'm testing 2100 mg/day first.  One interesting thing I've noticed is that I wake up feeling refreshed, rather than still tired.  So the extra niacin seems to be fluidizing my blood while I sleep.
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 Posted 12/26/2013 9:15:43 AM
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In The H Factor Solution, James Braly, 2009, says that more than 1000 mg of niacin can boost homocysteine. "... the removal of niacin from the body requires it to become methylated." He recommends matching niacin doses with an equal amount of TMG if you take more than 500 mg niacin.

Elaine


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