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CoQ10 - How much is too much?

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 Posted 10/8/2013 9:54:35 AM
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I've taken CoQ10 for many years as a supplement to my fitness program, in particular running which requires a degree of stamina. I've never been a strong runner but found that CoQ10 increased my stamina so that I could run longer distances without losing momentum.

Back in the 80s, when CoQ10 was being introduced as the latest thing in energy support supplements, my local Health Food Store was featuring 3000 MG bottles of the supplement at an introductory price. I bought one and was amazed at how much it actually increased my energy level during my next run. I've also read articles on the benefits of high doses of CoQ10 on the body as in the following report:

The skeletal muscles, heart, brain and other organs require Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) to create optimal energy production for growth and repair. The powerhouse of every cell is the mitochondria, which generates the ATP cells use for energy. CoQ10 helps supply this powerhouse with needed fuel. It is also used to battle heart failure, aid in stroke recovery and for anti-aging skin treatments. This nutrient has shown promise in combating Parkinson’s disease, chronic kidney failure and migraines. It’s used regularly in fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue protocols for its effect on energy production. Gum disease has also responded well to supplemental CoQ10. 

Unfortunately, there are differences of opinion about the benefits of CoQ10 which is always the case with vitamins and supplements. However, I'm interest in hearing from others about this both pro and con.
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 Posted 10/8/2013 10:25:44 AM
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Three thousand milligrams is a high dose.

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 Posted 10/9/2013 4:09:42 AM
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Most people here probably take 200 mg/day.  The maximum I've ever seen is 400 mg/day.  On the other hand, I'm not aware of any side effects at doses of 3000 mg/day, but I doubt that the body could use that much each day.
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 Posted 10/15/2013 6:21:36 AM
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DDye (10/8/2013)
Three thousand milligrams is a high dose.


I think 600 mg is probably a sufficient dosage. I recently purchased CoQ10 600 mg w/60 mg Tocotrienols and was wondering if LE offers something like this. The softgels in this particular supplement are really large and a challenge to swallow.  
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 Posted 10/15/2013 6:36:59 AM
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Life Extension does not have a CoQ10 capsule with a dosage this high.  See http://www.lef.org/search/products.aspx?q=CoQ10 for available formulas.

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 Posted 11/20/2013 10:00:19 AM
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This page from Linus Pauling Institute says that CoQ10 does not improve athletic performance.
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 Posted 3/31/2014 3:44:56 AM
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I was told by an supplement factory owner that the maximum a body can absorb of Q10 is 30mg/day. All higher doses just  flush out in expensive urine…….

Would like to hear an expert comment on this
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 Posted 3/31/2014 3:55:35 AM
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Welcome to the Forums, Avocado.

Was this person referring to ubiquinol or ubiquinone?


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 Posted 3/31/2014 4:26:51 AM
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It was ubiquinol.
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 Posted 3/31/2014 8:39:14 AM
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Avocado,

In a study of beagles given 600, 1200, 1800 or 2400 mg/kg/day ubiquinone for four weeks,  www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3288259/ubmed/22267890 , the highest plasma dose was achieved with animals given 1800 milligrams/kilogram/day in comparison with lower and higher doses. (Males weighed between 7 and 10 kg and the females between 6 and 8 kg at initiation of treatment.) Steady state levels were achieved after two weeks. Plasma CoQ10 levels were measured in micrograms per milliliter. According to the authors, "Application of safety factors to adjust for differences between humans and test animals, using a 50-fold margin of safety would suggest an acceptable daily intake of 36mg/kg/day in humans. This would equate to 2520mg/person/day in a person weighing 70kg. It is understood however that metabolic and physiological differences between humans and dogs exist that may influence tissue utilization or responses to CoQ10."

This study http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19284181 utilized 120 mg in humans and revealed superior absorption with a particular form of CoQ10. Whether a lower dose would have been just as effective was not investigated. This study http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19096118 also compares forms of CoQ10 and found variation in plasma levels. So it appears that when making statements such as that which you quoted, one needs to look at the form of CoQ10, duration and species.

This abstract http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17482886 states "Plasma CoQ10 concentrations platau at a dose of 2400 mg using one specific chewable tablet formulation." And the abstract for this human study http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16873950 concludes that "200 mg of oil/soft gel formulation of Q(10) caused a larger increase in Q(10) serum levels than 100 mg.

The above were retrieved from a perusal of abstracts retrieved from a search of the terms CoQ10 and absorption to 2006. It appears that doses higher than 30 mg are utilized. The coenzyme does not just elevate plasma levels but is absorbed into the tissues.


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